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Author Topic: Did the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami cause the Earth to alter its tilt?  (Read 25919 times)

Offline moses lawn

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It was reported that the Tsunami, or the earthquake that caused it, may have caused a 1 degree tilt in the Earth's axis.

If that is indeed true, what effects, both long and short term, can we expect to follow?
« Last Edit: 08/06/2008 22:16:08 by chris »


 

Offline gsmollin

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I didn't hear that, and I don't believe that. If such a small event could tilt the earth's axis 1 degree, the axis would be pointing all over the sky.
 

Offline neilep

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I agree with gsmollin...and I have not heard any reports akin to the earth tilting due to the tsunami,and it seems highly unlikly that , that particular earthquake/tsunami would have the power to do that. I can imagine though quite a few scare-mongering stories like that being made.

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Offline OldMan

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I read something in our local paper about the quake causing a wobble in the earth's rotation and had the same concerns/queries to the effect. Haven't heard anything else about it though.
 

Online chris

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Yes, there was a small 'wobble' and the length of the day was consequently altered by a few microseconds but, to my knowledge, no permanent alteration in our axis tilt. A shift of 1 degree is a huge amount and (I would anticipate) would cause considerable climate changes.

Chris

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Offline OldMan

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Offline neilep

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...can someone pass me the ketchup.....my hat is quite tough !!!........but surely the same can be said for every major earthquake, natural disaster etc etc over the years....I suppose the bottom line is that on a global scale...the earth is still safe....isn't it ?

'Men are the same as women...just inside out !'
« Last Edit: 06/01/2005 20:28:53 by neilep »
 

Offline Zichichi

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I realize that the sea can be more moved comprehensively therefore
the vapour can enhance in the air...........


nothing is created and nothing is destroyed
 

Offline gsmollin

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quote:
Originally posted by neilep

...can someone pass me the ketchup.....my hat is quite tough !!!........but surely the same can be said for every major earthquake, natural disaster etc etc over the years....I suppose the bottom line is that on a global scale...the earth is still safe....isn't it ?

'Men are the same as women...just inside out !'




Keep your hat on Neil, that shift was 1 inch, not one degree. Converting 1 inch at the pole to degrees gives 0.0000002 degrees. The author goes on the explain that the poles regularly wobble 30 feet, so I don't believe 1 inch is a problem. Yes, the earth is still the best place to live we know about.
 

Offline Exodus

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Seeing as this is earthquake/tsunami related, i'll move it to geology. okey dokey.
 

Offline Sadie

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I've heard this too. They say it's because the earthquake hit the highest point on the Richter scale (9.0).
And as you say, caused the 1 inch tilt in the Earths axis. Also causing the day to last a few microseconds longer and for the weather to be slightly greater.

It makes sense. But it doesn't quite fit.

Still, it is an interesting theory. :)
« Last Edit: 03/02/2005 10:19:04 by Sadie »
 

Offline Exodus

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To be honest though.... looking at the size of the earth its a tiny movement and really isn't going to cause any problems.
 

Offline Sadie

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I don't feel time passing by any quicker. (Only because it always feels as though it passes fast.
And the weather is always rather peculiar. Especially here in the UK.
 

Offline Jim Tree

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Friends who are avid hunters and are real nature conscience were saying that they witnessed the sunset approximately 6 to ten miles farther north than they have ever seen it. They are located on lake livingston, tx and they've been watching the sunset for many years over the lake.
 

Offline Jim Tree

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Friends who are avid hunters and are real nature conscience were saying that they witnessed the sunset approximately 6 to ten miles farther north than they have ever seen it. They are located on lake livingston, tx and they've been watching the sunset for many years over the lake.
 

Offline Jim Tree

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Friends who are avid hunters and are real nature conscience were saying that they witnessed the sunset approximately 6 to ten miles farther north than they have ever seen it. They are located on lake livingston, tx and they've been watching the sunset for many years over the lake.
 

Offline rabeldin

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Are we hearing about a language problem? For some non-native speakers of English, the distinction between a tilt (presumably permanent) and a wobble (explicitly temporary) may be unclear.

R A Beldin,
Improbable Statistician
 

Offline niko

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maybe there are things that just don't know. but to think 1 degree sounds like a small number but it effects a lot of people in many different ways one; i live in alaska and when we tilt for winter it gets cold and i mean averege of -45. now if the earth tilts it means it could get colder for use here or it could get warmer but ether way it still effects us and every one else.

niko aka mr.ree
 

Offline KnitKid

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quote:
Originally posted by Jim Tree

Friends who are avid hunters and are real nature conscience were saying that they witnessed the sunset approximately 6 to ten miles farther north than they have ever seen it. They are located on lake livingston, tx and they've been watching the sunset for many years over the lake.



I noticed that the sunrise and sunset are different here in Tulsa too. Before the earthquake that caused the tsunami, I could see the sunrise through the window above my kitchen sink-now I see it through the window above the washing machine, 8 feet south. I told this to a friend who lives on Long Island, and she noted that the shady spot near her pool was no longer there; same tree, same area, no shade.
Could a wobble last for a year?
 

Offline daveshorts

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Are you sure you have made these measurements at the same time of year as sunrise will alter a lot just due to the seasons.
 

Offline Ray hinton

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if a relatively small quake can cause a tilt of one degree in the earths axis, what will happen when one of the canary islands falls in half, that will be a splash to see.
 

Offline ukmicky

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quote:
what will happen when one of the canary islands falls in half, that will be a splash to see.

Hi Ray

I could be wrong but i think thats all been disproved.

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
 

Offline Ray hinton

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hi mickey
the concensus is that during some future eruption a large slice of one of them is headed west,a bit like the big crack in hawai,i hope im not on the beach if it does,i cant surf at all.
 

Online chris

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This is correct. There is a large slab of rock which is gently slipping into the ocean off the west of the Canaries. It is of sufficient volume to trigger a huge tsunami which will hit the eastern seaboard of the US, IF the piece drops into the sea en-masse. But this is a big if. It's much more likely that it will go piecemeal, and therefore with a much smaller splash.

The timescale for this event is, however, difficult to predict.

Chris

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Offline ukmicky

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I couldn't find the original scientific study i read which refuted the claims  regarding the canaries splitting in two and creating a giant tsunami which could threaten the american coast but i did find this.  i will keep looking for the original as it was a lot more in depth.

http://www.lapalma-tsunami.com/

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
« Last Edit: 01/02/2006 03:34:59 by ukmicky »
 

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