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Author Topic: Where did I catch MRSA?  (Read 4418 times)

beryl

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Where did I catch MRSA?
« on: 27/07/2008 20:39:44 »
beryl asked the Naked Scientists:

I am a 65y old lady with a very low immune system on steroids for 40 years. I've got lupus, myasthenia gravis and lots of other complications.

I worked and ran my own cleaning business for 23 years but had to give up last year. I got MRSA in a leg ulcer in May.

I'm 99.9% sure I got it up my surgery as it was the only place it was dressed.

I have had 3 months of hell with it and had 5 different treatments so far. Can you explain why i was told to go home not to tell family or friends that i have got it? Surely the community and public should be aware about it?

What are your thoughts on this please? Beryl

What do you think?


 

Offline RD

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Where did I catch MRSA?
« Reply #1 on: 27/07/2008 21:28:42 »
The ulcer formed before it was dressed, so could have been infected with MRSA before it was dressed.
The MRSA may be hospital/clinic acquired, but not necessarily, it is quite common in the general population...

Quote
Humans are a natural reservoir for S. aureus, and asymptomatic colonization is far more common than infection. Colonization of the nasopharynx, perineum, or skin, particularly if the cutaneous barrier has been disrupted or damaged, may occur shortly after birth and may recur anytime thereafter (6). Family members of a colonized infant may also become colonized. Transmission occurs by direct contact to a colonized carrier. Carriage rates are 25% to 50%; higher rates than in the general population are observed in injection drug users, persons with insulin-dependent diabetes, patients with dermatologic conditions, patients with long-term indwelling intravascular catheters, and health-care workers (7). Young children tend to have higher colonization rates, probably because of their frequent contact with respiratory secretions (8,9). Colonization may be transient or persistent and can last for years (10).
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol7no2/chambers.htm


Most people with lupus have cutaneous vasculitis: this may be the initial cause of your persistent ulcer.

Quote
Cutaneous vasculitis (CV) is a term used for inflammation of the blood vessels in the skin that occurs in up to 70% of patients with lupus erythematosus (LE). The inflammation affects the smaller vessels of the skin such as the capillaries and the medium-size vessels that include venules and arterioles.... If untreated, CV can lead to ulceration
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/554930


Perhaps treatments to increase blood flow are worth investigating, e.g.

(Cheap) Niacinamide (Vitamin B-3)...
Quote
Has also been used for management of many disorders, including livedoid vasculitis and leprosy.
Presumed mechanism of action is as an anti-inflammatory agent and as a vasodilator.
http://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic133.htm

(Expensive) Hyperbaric oxygen...
Quote
The value of hyperbaric oxygenation has been well established in the treatment of hypoxic and ischemic wounds in which local oxygen tensions are below optimal for healing. The greatest benefit of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is achieved in situations where the nutritive flow and oxygen supply to the repair tissue are compromised by local injury or infection, but in which the regional vascular network, a prerequisite for oxygen to reach tissues is intact or only partly damaged. On the other hand, hyperbaric oxygen seems to possess significant angiogenic potential in tissues suffering from chronic lack of oxygen due to defective vasculature.
http://www.springerlink.com/content/v0l067511l1u4848/
« Last Edit: 27/07/2008 21:42:55 by RD »
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Where did I catch MRSA?
« Reply #2 on: 27/07/2008 23:11:29 »
Hi Beryl

Sorry to hear you have fallen foul of this preventable disease. And very concerned that you were asked to keep it quiet. You should write to your MP about this and I feel you have cause to sue the hospital and if enough people sue them maybe they will clean up their act. Try eating garlic 3 times a day, eat with a tomato to make it palatable. Also rub crushed garlic on the base of your feet so it gets absorbed into the blood. A lady wrote an account of using garlic to combat MRSA on this forum so it may be worth doing a little research into it.

beryl asked the Naked Scientists:

I am a 65y old lady with a very low immune system on steroids for 40 years. I've got lupus, myasthenia gravis and lots of other complications.

I worked and ran my own cleaning business for 23 years but had to give up last year. I got MRSA in a leg ulcer in May.

I'm 99.9% sure I got it up my surgery as it was the only place it was dressed.

I have had 3 months of hell with it and had 5 different treatments so far. Can you explain why i was told to go home not to tell family or friends that i have got it? Surely the community and public should be aware about it?

What are your thoughts on this please? Beryl

What do you think?
 

Offline BenV

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Where did I catch MRSA?
« Reply #3 on: 27/07/2008 23:15:48 »
Surely the base of the feet wouldn't be the best place to get something to absorb through the skin?  Wrists, maybe?
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Where did I catch MRSA?
« Reply #4 on: 28/07/2008 09:21:04 »
Thinking about location to the ulcer Ben and the soles of the feet are less sensitive to irritants. Also it has been proven that iodine is absorbed effectively using this method.

Garlic has been used directly on open wounds to treat infections but as MRSA is systemic we need to treat the whole person rather than just the site of infection hence oral garlic and topical garlic on feet. 

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=15220.0

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=7257.0

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=5686.25

Surely the base of the feet wouldn't be the best place to get something to absorb through the skin?  Wrists, maybe?
 

Offline chris

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Where did I catch MRSA?
« Reply #5 on: 05/08/2008 13:11:40 »
Yes, but this lady is also immunosuppressed, so I'd be loathe to encourage her to rub things on the soles of her feet in case this provoked further tissue injury / skin breach and therefore helped another MRSA ulcer to start.

Chris
 

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Where did I catch MRSA?
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