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Author Topic: QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?  (Read 52936 times)

Offline Chemistry4me

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #25 on: 01/12/2008 22:12:20 »
Humans trying to find out how their brains work is just like a mouse saying "hey, how does my brain work? I think I'll try and find out".
Is that a fair comment to make??
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #26 on: 01/12/2008 22:15:45 »
Hey, where has my previous post gone?
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #27 on: 01/12/2008 22:19:11 »
I'll try again
Humans trying to find out how their brain works is like a mouse thinking to itself "hey, I wonder how my brain works, I think I'll try and find out"
Is that a fair comment for me to make?
 

Offline rhade

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #28 on: 03/12/2008 12:42:18 »
Sounds fair enough to me, dude.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #29 on: 04/12/2008 12:45:58 »
I think thats only true in that same sense that it would be if you replaced the word "brain" by, for example, "car".
I.e. I don't see it as true at all. Comparing people to mice in that way is just plain silly.
People already have some understanding of how the brain works and I don't know of any reason to think they will not make more progress on this matter.
 

Offline rhade

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #30 on: 08/01/2009 12:38:50 »
I don't know if we will ever fully understand how the brain works. There are many areas of science we have "some understanding" of, have done for some time... And haven't got a whole lot further.
Also, are we talking about how the brain works chemically and neurologically, or psychologically? Both are relevant.
 

Offline A Davis

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #31 on: 11/01/2009 22:00:04 »
It,s amazing to watch a child grow and develop, it's brain can assimilate any language on this planet with ease. This is not true as one gets older, even something as basic as facial recognition becomes a ploblem if one hasn't seen an old friend for a couple of years. The answer is stay young and beautiful then you will never forget. Need a youth pill!
 

Offline rhade

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #32 on: 15/01/2009 13:28:49 »
While I agree that children's brains are geared to learn in a way that adults just aren't, I believe my own memory has gotten better as I got older; maybe not the same as it was when I was very small, but better than it was for most of my school days.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #33 on: 16/01/2009 01:52:27 »
Declarative knowledge: which requires processing in the medial temporal region and parts of the thalamus and can be grouped into working memory, episodic memory, and semantic memory.
Working memory allows us to keep and use information in our minds and is mediated by a network of areas in the cerebral cortex.
Episodic memory lets us store and replay events in our minds and depends on the hippocampus.
Semantic memory includes raw facts and data and is stored throughout the cerebral cortex. The hippocampus may play a role in integrating new episodic memories into the semantic memory storehouse.
In contrast, nondeclarative knowledge, the knowledge of how to do something, is expressed in skilled behavior and learned habits and requires processing by the basal ganglia.

So what kind of memory do you mean by when you said that it has gotten better? :-\
 

Offline rhade

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #34 on: 04/02/2009 13:02:24 »
Semantic memory. That is definitely better than when I was younger. As for episodic memory, the further I am in time from an event, the more it fades, with perhaps a few exceptions, events which are too major to easily forget.
I guess the working memory depends on how much "work" I give to a particular memory. If I've not used a particular piece of info for a while, it can fade.
 

Offline demografx

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #35 on: 01/09/2009 00:54:59 »

According to Einstein's diaries, he didn't feel compelled to memorize his phone number. It gave him more brain space for important scientific thoughts. Was this reasonable, considering what we know today?
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #36 on: 01/09/2009 06:09:39 »
Maybe he was talking a leaf from Mr. Holmes's book

"You see," he explained, "I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skilful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones."

-Sherlock Holmes, in "A Study in Scarlet"
 

Offline demografx

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #37 on: 01/09/2009 23:23:20 »

Many thanks, C4M. For some reason this idea has stayed in my mind for decades after first reading about it. Maybe I took it to heart and have tried to do some selective retention since then. But I do know my phone number. And many other phone numbers that are absolutely useless in my life now, but I can tell you an elementary school friend's phone number from many decades ago.

Another thing I noticed when reading about it yesterday was that Einstein had a small brain. Not sure how significant that was, but maybe it was to him. (Cranium envy?) :)
 

Offline rogelio

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #38 on: 03/10/2009 08:19:25 »
our brain keeps storing infos,according to the researches done the stored iformation is just blocked by the present informations you just need to recall it,in short our brain is limitless
 

Offline Shibs

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #39 on: 04/10/2009 07:47:47 »
Two parts. Should you aim to learn less? No!



There has been an idea for some time in the dementia research that people who are well educated have some sort of 'reserve' mentally. In other words, they have some proven degree of protection against a fall in thinking ability IF they get dementia.

You will see this idea yo-yo-ing out of the popular press on a very frequent basis.

Second part. Is learning good for me?  Most probably.

I think that another point to consider is how memories are actually built in the human brain.

There are two separate bits: forming the memory and retrieving the memory.

How do we know that this second bit is separate and different?  Many reasons - but ask anybody with Alzheimer's disease or their nearest and dearest one. They will tell you that memories for today are much harder to recall than memories for decades ago.

So, as soon as you use up your temporary forming ability, the memory gets transferred to the retrieval bit - so learning is probably good for you in answer to your question!  It would be virtually impossible to run out of space for the retrieval bit - nobody ever has, to my knowledge, not even Einstein!

kindest regards
 ;D
« Last Edit: 04/10/2009 10:17:27 by Shibs »
 

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QotW - 08.09.07 - Can my brain become too full?
« Reply #39 on: 04/10/2009 07:47:47 »

 

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