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Author Topic: Maxwell's silver hammer - how useful would a silver hammer really be?  (Read 4769 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Many of us will remember The Beatles classic about a hammer-wielding psycho (what a jolly little ditty). But what about his preferred implement for killing - his silver hammer?

What use would a silver hammer be apart from stoving in people's heads? Could it actually be used to bang in nails etc, or would it be too soft?
« Last Edit: 02/08/2008 11:35:01 by BenV »


 

Offline Soul Surfer

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The main advantage of silver is that it would be quite heavy but stronger than lead.  Soft hammers are used for many purposes particularly when it is desired to shape things gently without creating large hammer blow dents.

However this question got me thinking on the nature of human language generally. It is amazing to me how literally many people take things that are put in prose and poetry.  They fail to consider the many alternative meanings such a combination of words could have. For example here are just a few.

Firstly the hammer could just have been a normal hammer but nice and new and clean and polished with a silvery colour. 

Secondly the hammer and story could be entirely metaphorical for example referring to Maxwells verbal dexterity and ability to create a "killing" put down for his victims in public. 

Finally the words could have had no meaning whatsoever but have been used purely for the sound quality and their ability to fit with the music.  Lennon and McCartney often did this when developing their songs  because frequently the tunes came before the words.

I understand that the well known song "yesterday" started initially with the word  "scrambled egg" instead of the critical word that made it so popular in many ways.
 

Offline RD

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Copper-faced hammer, the replaceable copper bits dent rather than denting the thing you are hitting.



http://www.justoffbase.co.uk/Copper-Faced-Hammer-2lb-Hickory-Shaft-Sealey-CFH02
« Last Edit: 02/08/2008 11:34:34 by RD »
 

Offline that mad man

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That track is on my all time rubbish track list I'm afraid to say.

Ringo Starr; "The worst session ever was 'Maxwell's Silver Hammer.' It was the worst track we ever had to record. It went on for f***ing weeks. I thought it was mad."

I don't think being silver had much meaning although it is a good conductor of electricity, the track was about pataphysics and nonsense.
« Last Edit: 02/08/2008 16:53:22 by that mad man »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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The main advantage of silver is that it would be quite heavy but stronger than lead.  Soft hammers are used for many purposes particularly when it is desired to shape things gently without creating large hammer blow dents.

So a silver hammer could actually have a use. Thanks.

Quote
Finally the words could have had no meaning whatsoever but have been used purely for the sound quality and their ability to fit with the music.  Lennon and McCartney often did this when developing their songs  because frequently the tunes came before the words.


That's what I do too.
 

Offline Counterpoints

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The main advantage of silver is that it would be quite heavy but stronger than lead.  Soft hammers are used for many purposes particularly when it is desired to shape things gently without creating large hammer blow dents.

However this question got me thinking on the nature of human language generally. It is amazing to me how literally many people take things that are put in prose and poetry.  They fail to consider the many alternative meanings such a combination of words could have. For example here are just a few.

Firstly the hammer could just have been a normal hammer but nice and new and clean and polished with a silvery colour. 

Secondly the hammer and story could be entirely metaphorical for example referring to Maxwells verbal dexterity and ability to create a "killing" put down for his victims in public. 

Finally the words could have had no meaning whatsoever but have been used purely for the sound quality and their ability to fit with the music.  Lennon and McCartney often did this when developing their songs  because frequently the tunes came before the words.

I understand that the well known song "yesterday" started initially with the word  "scrambled egg" instead of the critical word that made it so popular in many ways.

Scrambled eggs is a typical Mccartney placeholder name: he used a phrase with the word 'egg' in it to label many works in progress,  not just yesterday.  He even went so far as to name an album of pretty much incomplete songs "Back to the Egg". It's very unlikely -- basically impossible -- that he used it because it fit well with the music.

But McCartney did use a 'silver' hammer because it sounded good -- at least I am pretty sure this is what he said in an interview.  And I think the idea that Maxwell was metaphorically hammering them down with arguments is pretty unlikely. :P (He knocks on Joan's door, after asking her out to the pictures, and then knocks her down with an argument?)
Finally, most of the words weren't completely meaningless or written to fit with the music, since the song told a very obvious chronological story.

 

Offline syhprum

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Werewolves are normally dispatched with a Silver bullet but you might at least disable one with a Silver hammer.
It would also assist in driving a stake into the heart of a vampire if nothing heavier was available.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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I think a silver hammer would work better than Appolo's silver bow. Silver is roughly as elastic as cheese.
 

Offline AllenG

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It would be great for removing knock-off (spoked) wheels, from a Brit ragtop.
 

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