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Author Topic: Landing On A Pulsar?  (Read 3021 times)

Offline Titanscape

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Landing On A Pulsar?
« on: 07/01/2005 17:16:56 »
Imagine a pulsar that spins so quickly that surface gravity on the equator is like that of the Earth or Moon due to centrifugal forces. And then a probe sent in the correct trajectory could land on the equators surface and attempt to send back information. Air pressure, temperature, mass spectrometer readings, images... That is admittedlyvery far fetched.

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Offline gsmollin

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Re: Landing On A Pulsar?
« Reply #1 on: 07/01/2005 20:22:35 »
I'll have to dig for this one, but I don't think it's possible. At least, as you have defined it, it is not. Lok at your scenario: A neutron star with 1 g acceleration at the surface. That's not a neutron star. The acceleration is crushing on a neutron star, otherwise the matter is normal-atomic, and I don't think it can spin as rapidly as you have postulated.
 

Offline Titanscape

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Re: Landing On A Pulsar?
« Reply #2 on: 08/01/2005 15:33:37 »
ok

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Offline gsmollin

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Re: Landing On A Pulsar?
« Reply #3 on: 09/01/2005 19:09:09 »
Apparently, the fastest pulsars rotate with periods of 10 ms. The rotational period would have to be about 100 times faster to cause breakup. I doubt this can happen in practice. It would be a very strange pulsar. I think the gravitational and rotational effects would be so severe that no human could withstand the tidal forces. At your foot, it would be 1g, and at your head, it would be ripped off.
 

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Re: Landing On A Pulsar?
« Reply #3 on: 09/01/2005 19:09:09 »

 

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