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Author Topic: How effective is this Aortic Stent procedure..and how often is it used?  (Read 2738 times)

Offline Karen W.

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http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2006/1010-defusing_ticking_time_bombs.htm

I wonder if it could be used on me! I wonder if thats what he means by replacing my aorta with a flexon tube...??

I asked if they would just stent it like in the video,but he said they were just going to replace the whole Aorta..,??? Could I be misunderstanding him...???
« Last Edit: 13/08/2008 17:26:47 by Karen W. »


 

Offline RD

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This type of endograft is only suitable where the aortic aneurysm is not close to any branches (it would block them).

Just read about this new (2005) type of endograft which can be used with branches,
(it has openings to allow blood flow through the branches, it has to be tailor-made to fit patient)...
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0EIN/is_2005_Oct_25/ai_n15732952

Some statistics which may be of interest...
Quote
What is the chance of an abdominal aortic aneurysm rupturing?
The chance of rupture is low if an AAA is small. As a rule, the risk of rupture increases with increasing size. This is much like a balloon - the larger you blow it up, the greater the pressure, the greater the chance it will burst. The diameter of an AAA can be measured by an ultrasound scan. The following gives overall risk figures for the size (diameter) of the aneurysm:

40 mm - 55 mm - about a 1 in 100 chance of rupture per year.
55 mm - 60 mm - about a 10 in 100 chance of rupture per year.
60 mm - 69 mm - about a 15 in 100 chance of rupture per year.
70 mm - 79 mm - about a 35 in 100 chance of rupture per year.
80 mm or more - about a 50 in 100 chance of rupture per year.

Should everyone with an abdominal aortic aneurysm have surgery?
The short answer is no. Surgical repair of an AAA is a major operation and carries risks. A small number of people will die during, or shortly after, the operation. If you have a small AAA, the risk of death caused by surgery is higher than the risk of rupture. Therefore, surgery is usually not advised if you have an AAA less than 50 mm wide. However, regular ultrasound scans will normally be advised to see if it gets larger over time.

Surgery is commonly advised if you develop an AAA larger than 50 mm. For these larger aneurysms the risk of rupture is usually higher than the risk of surgery. However, if your general state of health is poor, or if you have certain other medical conditions, this may increase the risk if you have surgery. So, in some cases the decision to operate may be a difficult one.

http://www.patient.co.uk/showdoc/23069105/
« Last Edit: 13/08/2008 22:35:36 by RD »
 

Offline Karen W.

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I have two aneurysms one in the ascending aorta and one on the descending side.

Hey are there 10 millimeters per centimeter or have I got that wrong?
 

Offline Karen W.

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That would be three millimeters away from the 5 centimeters?? Is that correct!
 

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