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Author Topic: Maynard's Sour Pastilles  (Read 3669 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« on: 14/08/2008 22:30:45 »
They don't half make Cabernet-Shiraz taste funny!


 

Offline LeeE

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #1 on: 14/08/2008 23:50:14 »
You are doing them in the right order, aren't you?

Obviously it'll taste funny if you're doing it the wrong way around.
 

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #2 on: 14/08/2008 23:59:00 »
I dropped 1 in my glass. D'OH!
 

Offline LeeE

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #3 on: 15/08/2008 00:05:38 »
WRONG!!!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #4 on: 15/08/2008 00:16:02 »
Yup
 

Offline JimBob

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #5 on: 15/08/2008 00:54:13 »
OK, so you put candy in wine in the UK. (I found out that the fruity ones are used inn that manner.)

WHAT THE FEK ?????????????????

And what is "clotted cream" all about, anyway?

(The English get stranger and stranger every time you learn something new about them.)
« Last Edit: 15/08/2008 00:55:49 by JimBob »
 

Offline LeeE

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #6 on: 15/08/2008 01:01:37 »
Actually, there's very little that's new about the English - we just have an extemely large reservoir of old eccentricity to draw upon.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #7 on: 15/08/2008 01:27:42 »
It's called clotted cream because it's made by village idiots.
 

Offline JimBob

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #8 on: 15/08/2008 01:48:14 »
Actually, there's very little that's new about the English - we just have an extemely large reservoir of old eccentricity to draw upon.

Such as Doctor Beaver. I understand.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #9 on: 15/08/2008 11:36:00 »
I thought you were my friend
 

Offline JimBob

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #10 on: 15/08/2008 18:09:09 »
Oh my, he is in his sensitive mood - unusual but understandable.

Beav., my friend, I just wish to assure you the "eccentric" is not a derogatory word. The tradition of eccentricity is a very long and honored one - from well before the time Sir William Flinders Petri measured exactly the dimensions of the pyramids of Giza wearing only his tutu and a pith helmet, Issac Newton would cast his horoscope regularly, was also socially awkward at best, an avid student of Biblical prophecy and alchemy.

Others such as great actors - I give you "... Robert Coates, self-styled "Gifted Amateur," was not just a bad actor—he was so execrable that Londoners of the early 19th century fought at the box office to see his performances. Groundlings came to the theater carrying almost every conceivable throwable object,* causing such terror among Mr. Coates's fellow actors that they invariably skewed and pied all the best-known lines of the great tragedies, transforming them into matchless comedies. Coates himself cared little for the lines but much for his costumes: playing Romeo on one occasion, he cried, "Oh, let me hence, I stand on sudden haste," and then, as if wording the action to his suit, dropped "on all fours and crawled round and round the stage," searching for a buckle that had burst from his trousers. It was in a performance of Romeo and Juliet that 1) Mr. Coates was almost struck by a flung Bantam cock, 2) Paris, lying dead on the stage, was instantaneously "raised to life by 'a terrific blow on the nose from an orange.' " "

In this century, such greats as Dame Edith Sitwell exists as sterling examples of eccentricity. She is a person  who "believes that eccentricity is particularly British chiefly for two reasons: 1) "that peculiar and satisfactory knowledge of infallibility that is the hallmark of the British nation," 2) "all great gentlemen are eccentric [because] their gestures are not born to fit the conventions or the cowardice of the crowd." "

And then there is those who do give eccentricity a bad name. Ergo, "Dr. James Graham pleased Londoners in the 1780s by opening a "Hymeneal Temple." Centerpiece of this edifice was the "Celestial Bed," over which "presided" a pretty young healer named Miss Emma Lyons. Gentlemen who found the "Celestial Bed" (fee: £100 per night) somewhat fatiguing could retreat to another bed to be refreshed with charges of "Magneto-Electric" virility (fee: £50 per night). Dr. Graham soon abdicated from his "Electrical Throne," but Emma Lyons married Sir William Hamilton and, in due course, became the historic sharer of the celestial bed of Admiral Lord Nelson."

So you still have the ability to marry well, even with you proclivities.

AND, no matter what you eccentricities, I shall remain your friend.

*Credits for quotes "England's Darlings" an article found at http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,810245,00.html

Here you can also read about the nudist water fowl hunter Mango, The King of Pickels, Hippophobe Hirst who went shooting mounted on a massive bull of "uncertain temper," Mr. William Huntington, "The Coal-heaver Preacher," and Lord Rokeby (born 1712) who lived in his bath.

There are numerous other well respected people who have been somewhat eccentric. Please, just consider it English, not hurtful.


(Grrrrr - must coddle this guy like a small child!)


« Last Edit: 15/08/2008 18:28:49 by JimBob »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #11 on: 16/08/2008 10:06:29 »
Oh dear, JamBib's gone all spurious again.
 

Offline JimBob

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #12 on: 16/08/2008 15:33:55 »
Oh dear, JamBib's gone all spurious again.

It is called being informative. There are people who equate you eccentricity with  bring "crazy." I am just trying to allay that fear and prove that, although not as conforming to societal norms as others, you are most surely not "crazy," as some would suggest.
 

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Maynard's Sour Pastilles
« Reply #12 on: 16/08/2008 15:33:55 »

 

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