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Author Topic: Can how people announciate and use the mouth affect facial muscle development?  (Read 5603 times)

Offline Karen W.

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What I mean is that in different cultures if you look closely You may see similarities in basic facial features as far as structure of the muscle development in the face! Is it possible some of us rounder less slender faced people annunciate differently and perhaps do not use our lips to form letters properly.. and could a more relaxed annunciation whilst talking, lead to a less structured look as far as the physical appearance of our faces.. I tend to notice sharper more sculpted faces in those people who annunciate well, the words they speak with!

I see more structured features almost sharper with say some singers etc.. People who speak or talk for a living.. a lot of teachers etc..


Has anyone ever noticed this at all.. and does exercising ones face help make ones face physically stronger in features.. I would think as much as I Jabber my face would be very fit...  I did do facial exercises for awhile after my mini stroke as my eye above my brow was sagging! I think it helped some but still needs more.. Am I wasting my time trying to fix that muscle above my eye?
« Last Edit: 24/08/2008 05:33:38 by Karen W. »


 

Offline JnA

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In theatre we 'warm up' our faces and mouths before performing, like any athlete would warm up their muscles before heavy usage.

Children who are chronic dummy suckers tend to be slower at developing 'understandable' speech, which, I believe, is due to the position that a dummy (pacifier) holds the mouth.. like any muscle if you don't use it....

Racially, language plays a huge role in the muscles we use for talking. You can see the results of this when people try to learn different languages that incorporate sounds or letters that do not form part of their first language.
I've never met and French person that couldn't roll their 'r's', for example, but I have met many English speakers that cannot.


I don't know if that answers your questions, but hope that helps in some way.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Well it sort of does.. I wonder if strong features are developed partly due to the use of these muscles when talking.. The way they shape their mouth or hold there lips etc.. does this at all show in a particular culture.. in the way their faces might be shaped.. You know what I mean?
 

Offline JnA

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Facial features (such as a strong jaw line, or a larger nose) are usually a result of breeding. CAn you work your muscles as a developing teen and change the shape of your face??  hmm interesting question, I would think not to the extent that it would be 'quite obvious' but perhaps subtle differences. Hormones play a large(r) role in development.

 

Offline Karen W.

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I was wondering that, as I knew that bone structure is hereditary,but am looking more to the muscle movement involved in speaking certain ways, as muscles help define features too.
« Last Edit: 28/08/2008 11:55:19 by Karen W. »
 

Offline JnA

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I would think any effect would be minimal and possibly imperceptible. I am willing to be corrected by someone who might know more.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Yes may be right, I would be curious though also..
 

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