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Author Topic: SCI, CNS and WDYT  (Read 2597 times)

Offline JnA

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« on: 28/08/2008 07:26:56 »
I was listening to an old podcast talking about imagination. Basically it said that if you imagine horizontal lines and are shown vertical lines the brain flickers back and forth between. (I hope I havce that right)

It prompted a little spark of a memory in my brain about the central nervous system.

Back when I first got involved with spinal cord injuries (SCI's), about 12 years ago) there was a film about a bloke with a high injury that 'determined' himself better. Astounding all medical staff he learned to drink, talk and eventually walk again. (of course the medical profession is full of these miraculous stories)
One of the things he said he did to pass the many days of lying in a halo, was to imagine his limbs moving again.

He said the central nervous system cannot tell the difference between imagined movement and actual movement, therefore he spent ages imagining himself moving ( he thought about each muscle) and essentially 'willed' himself into movement.

The evidence is there, he *is* walking again when medical opinion though he would not, but I wonder about the mechanism and if he wasn't just lucky that he must have had some undamaged pathway to retrain.

It is common for the profession to 'give the worst case scenario' with something as unpredictable as spinal cord injuries, and with good reason most of the time, but I wonder if they gave the best case scenario, people might recover function to a higher degree with the belief they might get better.
I know it's an iffy area and emotionally, for a person who does not succeed, it could be devastating.. but what do you think about the CNS idea? could it be real or was the fellow in the example just lucky?


 

Offline Evie

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« Reply #1 on: 12/09/2008 19:06:00 »
This is the main premise in the book and movie "The Secret."

Until we fully understand the effects of quantum mechanics and how our thoughts (brain waves) can affect the world around us, it will be hard to know what the power of positive thinking can accomplish.

I also saw a study where athletes visualizing themselves participating in their given sport causes their muscles to fire.

In my opinion, this also seems to go along with the old addage: "Laughter is the best medicine."

I know there are a lot of people who would say that you are merely giving people false hope if you tell them something like, "Oh if you think about getting better, you will," but there may be something to letting people know their positive options as well as the negative.
 

Offline RD

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« Reply #2 on: 12/09/2008 19:44:22 »
Quote
Religious People Live Longer Than Nonbelievers
WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Martin F. DownsAug. 9, 2000 --

Religion appears to soothe the body as well as the soul, as people who are highly religious tend to live longer than others, a review of more than 40 scientific studies has found.

In fact, overall, the people who were most involved in their religions were 29% more likely to be alive when the various studies were completed than were their nonreligious counterparts...

"They [religious people] also receive a lot of positive social support that helps them to cope with stress," says McCullough, who is now an associate professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

Finally, "religion helps people to develop a coherent set of beliefs about the world that help them to make sense of their stress and suffering," he says. "All of these factors are probably at least partially responsible for the links between religious involvement and health."
http://www.webmd.com/news/20000809/religious-people-live-longer-than-nonbelievers

This is not divine intervention, the religious people suffer less stress, stress which would have weakend their immune system, (increase cortisol), and increased the chance of them succumbing to infection or cancer.

So spurious beliefs in gods, or mind-over-matter (visualisation), or "lucky" charms can have heath benefits in that they can reduce harmful stress.


"Laughter is the best medicine."

For diabetics it's insulin. :)
« Last Edit: 12/09/2008 19:54:00 by RD »
 

Offline JnA

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« Reply #3 on: 14/09/2008 07:24:25 »
Hmm in the LHC podcast last week, Chris talked about mirror neurons.

 

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« Reply #3 on: 14/09/2008 07:24:25 »

 

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