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Author Topic: How are satellites and the ISS protected from micro-meteors?  (Read 4226 times)

Harsh Maheshwari

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Harsh Maheshwari  asked the Naked Scientists:

In school, I was taught that thousands of small pebble-sized meteors enter the Earth's atmosphere every day (because of gravity) and get burnt up in the atmosphere before striking the surface.

Don't they ever strike the satellites that are orbiting the Earth? I would imagine that even a small pebble travelling at hundreds of kilometres per hour can seriously damage satellites and the ISS. How do they protect themselves?

Harsh
New Delhi, India

What do you think?


 

Offline graham.d

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How are satellites and the ISS protected from micro-meteors?
« Reply #1 on: 18/09/2008 14:42:45 »
Yes they do and they have. The chance is still quite small though. During periods when there are many meteorties (Leonids for example) there is a quite a good chance that one of the many orbiting satellites will be damaged, if not by the actual impact then by the subsequent cloud of plasma that results from it.

The ISS has been struck...

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Meteorite-Struck-the-International-Space-Station-56724.shtml

 

The Naked Scientists Forum

How are satellites and the ISS protected from micro-meteors?
« Reply #1 on: 18/09/2008 14:42:45 »

 

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