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Author Topic: Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?  (Read 12976 times)

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #25 on: 05/01/2009 00:28:57 »
Never mind my responses being extracts from a mothers scientfic writing but yours is like a marmite extraction which you either love or hate.

Take it from me, I don't need to take time here, however, i have learned the love of those who don't fully love their own respect of science, as much as I love marmite itself.

So... as it is, butter the bread, before i toast it.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #26 on: 05/01/2009 00:45:43 »
I too like marmite but I don't butter the bread nowadays, too much fat :-)
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #27 on: 05/01/2009 01:01:05 »
Would you butter mine?
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #28 on: 05/01/2009 01:14:17 »
I'm, sorry... i JUST saw your age. I will bark up another tree.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #29 on: 05/01/2009 07:45:00 »
LOL. You can enjoy your cottaging elsewhhere. :-0 You must remember that I am a real scientist and always talk literally and avoid double entendres unless I am deliberately writing humorously.   You must also remember that this is a place for people to come and discuss science seriously and not one for confusing "humorous" writing if that is your intent with some of your offerings.
« Last Edit: 05/01/2009 08:17:30 by Soul Surfer »
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #30 on: 05/01/2009 17:27:14 »
I take science very very seriously, and i don't want tyo derail peoples learning here with ''intentially-misleading'' language as you once described my workings. As i said, i am very serious about science, and i study physics at a fascility close to home.

I will never intentionally-mislead anyone here, and hopefully, i will talk sometimes, in a way the non-scientist may or may not understand, but i base the way i communicate on the knowledge of how i found it difficult to analyse science back in the day when i had no training. So its a goos stance for me to use this ability.

So let us, kiss and make up, mind the pun, and just get on with our work here. Hopefully, you will learn i am serious about science.
 

Offline Lupernikes

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #31 on: 24/03/2009 15:18:12 »
Hmmm it always bothers me when people poo-poo an idea which could have merit but which bucks accepted theories of science....anyone remember a chap called Copernicus, Gallileo?  Science moves on when science can admit it might be wrong and accept change.....if not it is no better than religion, moving only within the confort zone created by it's own dogma.

What we know about exotic/dark matter as yet is NOTHING; we have plenty of theories and mathematical formulae which seemto explain it well enough but, as all scientists I am sure are aware, a lot of what we have discovered in the last 50 years has turned most of what was believed previously on it's head.

An important lesson, I feel,  for scientists is to avoid the word "impossible", as science is, in essence, the art of stretching the possible and going beyond it.

Dark matter could be sat at the Earth's core and we would never know because we have, as yet, not observed significant amounts of it to know how a concentration of it would behave or be affected by physical matter.  Either that or dark matter is simply a more modern version of the "Lumiferous aether" used by scientists long ago to avoid having to say "I don't know" instead.  Don't confuse fact with theory when you flame someone please

just a thought though....aren't these constants based upon measurements made upon the planet in question?  whether you need a planet or not, formulae for the calculation were made here.....
« Last Edit: 24/03/2009 15:23:07 by Lupernikes »
 

Offline questioner

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #32 on: 25/10/2009 03:01:41 »
Dark matter or star dust call it what you like. Maybe it sends a signal that affects the energy in an atom to react, hence gravity!
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #33 on: 25/10/2009 06:57:54 »
No.
 

Offline Vern

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #34 on: 25/10/2009 14:30:42 »
Dark matter, if it exists, would need some property that prevents its clumping. Otherwise we should see large concentrations of it. If I remember correctly, the arithmetic puts the dark matter evenly dispersed throughout the galaxy or in a halo around the galaxy.

I can think of a mechanism that might provide the halo, but I haven't tested its possibility with numbers. Most galaxies are a few hundred thousand light years in diameter. They accreted from a huge cloud of debris and they have been spewing out radiation since their first star lit. Maybe all this spewed out radiation produces enough gravity to affect the arithmetic.

Edit: Another thought; portions of the gas cloud from which the galaxy accreted may be held at a distance by the galaxies cosmic wind, mentioned above; I just named it; Cosmic Wind meaning the accumulation of stardust and radiation from all the stars that make up a galaxy. :)
« Last Edit: 25/10/2009 21:21:55 by Vern »
 

Offline Dimi

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #35 on: 25/10/2009 23:10:26 »
Perhaps the probability of its existance has more power than the actuality of its existance?

That would be cool.

Is there no way to take a 'capsule of space' back onto earth? *shy*
 

Offline Vern

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Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #36 on: 27/10/2009 05:44:48 »
This idea gets more interesting as I ponder it. Galaxies must produce a Cosmic Wind just as each star produces a Stellar Wind. Maybe we should call it Galactic Wind. This out-spewing of radiation and ionic debris should offer some resistance to returning ionic debris and remnants of the accretion disk from which the galaxy formed. This dynamic should produce a halo around a galaxy that would have some effect on the gravity felt by the galaxy as a whole.

I am not sure if this is taken into account by the models of galaxies that seem to indicate the presence of some kind of unknown producer of gravity, or Dark Matter.

Edit: Maybe I should say calculations based upon observations rather than models of galaxies.
« Last Edit: 27/10/2009 11:23:08 by Vern »
 

Offline pensacolahomesales

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Re: Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #37 on: 05/03/2015 15:57:08 »
I'm not a scientist but I am highly educated and observant.

We know that to have a fusion reaction (I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong) you must have a containment field with either compression from without or within. I'm assuming that the Sun operates this way. What could create the compression force to sustain that reaction? A smaller "piece" of whatever is at the center of the sun being at the core of all planets and large moons would seem to explain not only what mushed them together but what creates the gravity. The bigger the piece the more the gravity and if it's big enough, like the Earth, it creates a molten core from the intense attraction. If large enough it creates a star and if even larger, a wormhole between parts of the universe. What else could pull matter together with such force?
 

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Re: Would We Notice Dark Matter At The Center Of The Earth?
« Reply #37 on: 05/03/2015 15:57:08 »

 

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