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Author Topic: How do plants protect their cells from UV damage?  (Read 3241 times)

Chris Burgess

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Chris Burgess  asked the Naked Scientists:
Hello Chris,

How different are the cells of a leaf from the cells of our skin with respect to protecting DNA from UVA and UVB damage?

Do the cells of a leaf ever get anything like skin cancer?

Are there clues here for a researcher in skin cancer?

Thanks,
Chris Burgess
Felton, California

What do you think?


 

Offline RD

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How do plants protect their cells from UV damage?
« Reply #1 on: 27/09/2008 16:10:40 »
Flowers usually reflect UV light strongly, (and can even fluoresce), as pollinating insects can see UV ...

http://www.naturfotograf.com/UV_OENO_BIE.html#top

http://www.naturfotograf.com/UV_TARA_VUL.html#top
« Last Edit: 27/09/2008 17:28:11 by RD »
 

Offline chris

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How do plants protect their cells from UV damage?
« Reply #2 on: 27/09/2008 23:03:26 »
Edelweiss has an intriguing strategy to combat the high UV exposure it experiences, growing as it does at high altitude. The plant is covered in fine hairs that composed of filaments similar in dimension to the wavelength of UV light (about 150nm). This allows the fibres to interfere with the UV, absorbing it and chanelling it into water within the hair core, thus dissipating the energy harmlessly above the leaf surface.

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/news/news/1178/

Chris
 

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How do plants protect their cells from UV damage?
« Reply #2 on: 27/09/2008 23:03:26 »

 

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