The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Horizontal lightening  (Read 20586 times)

Offline Limpet chicken

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 23
    • View Profile
Horizontal lightening
« on: 04/02/2005 01:41:58 »
A while ago, I saw something that would have been quite beautiful if it were not such a sign of dark times to come.

I was walking with my fiancee, during the day time, it was sunny and warm, but raining, and we saw a double rainbow, one on top of the other, not a faint shadow, like you sometimes see, but fully colored bright rainbows.

Then lightening darted from two clouds, under the arc of the rainbow, from one side to the other, it was really strange, it went from one cloud, horizontally through the rainbows arch, to another cloud.

Quite beautiful, or it would have been, but the meaning behind it just gave me the creeps instead.

What could be the physical cause of horizontal lightening like this, its not a common omen, but it has been seen before I think, its definately the only time, fortunately, that I have seen it myself?

Non omnis moriar, tenebris e lumen.


 

Offline gsmollin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 749
    • View Profile
Re: Horizontal lightening
« Reply #1 on: 04/02/2005 17:43:32 »
The cause of the lightning is a potential difference between the clouds. Cloud-cloud lightning is very common, although not usually visible from the ground. I have seen giant thunderheads from an altitude of 40,000 feet, and the lightning discharges were continuous. The discharge paths seemed to be in every direction: up, down, sideways, even sinuously curved paths. We stayed a very respectable distance from that monster!
« Last Edit: 04/02/2005 17:45:19 by gsmollin »
 

Offline OldMan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 222
    • View Profile
Re: Horizontal lightening
« Reply #2 on: 07/02/2005 02:03:29 »
Afraid I don't see any omen in horizontal lightning nor even heard of it but am curious as to what you think it means
 

Offline Ultima

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 488
    • View Profile
    • My Homepage
Re: Horizontal lightening
« Reply #3 on: 07/02/2005 17:08:33 »
Is this the same as "sheet" lightning?

wOw the world spins?
 

Offline Alandriel

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 522
  • Thanked: 2 times
    • View Profile
    • Some of my photography
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #4 on: 01/11/2007 19:52:27 »
Horizontal lightening has fascinated me for a long time. In the desert (Sinai) I used to see it quite often and so the statement by gsmolin although not usually visible from the ground astonishes me and I wonder why it should be rare.

I've found a pretty good illustration


that shows the charges


but it's nothing like the real thing  [8D]

 

lyner

  • Guest
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #5 on: 01/11/2007 20:06:34 »
I should imagine it is rare because, normally, the clouds in which you get serious charge buildup are probably very tall.  The charge separation works like a van der graaf generator - high speed vertical winds carry the charges around.
It needs the bottom bit of one charged cloud to end up nearer the top end of another than it is to the ground.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #6 on: 02/11/2007 13:47:22 »
I am not sure if i can write this, so that it makes sense to anyone, but i will try.

To start with, cloud to cloud (CC) lightning is not that rare at all. Possibly 1 in 4 of all lightning is CC, it is just that you do not notice it very well.

What we normally think of as lightning, cloud to ground, occurs when you have the negative cloud base and a positively charged ground, I'm sure we all know this.

What happens in CC lightning is that the lightning is caused by the top of the storm cloud, which is positively charged, and the bottom of another cloud which is negatively charged.

One characteristic of CC  lightning, that you will have noticed is the noise their thunder makes. The long, low rumbling thunder is generally caused by cc lightning as opposed to the large cracking noise made by cloud to ground thunder.

does that make sense? some things are easier to know, that put to "paper"
« Last Edit: 02/11/2007 22:11:03 by paul.fr »
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #7 on: 02/11/2007 18:00:20 »
Lots of lightening threads in this Forum!  [8D]

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by lightarrow</i>

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by science_guy</i>

And about lightning, I dont think it will ever hit water.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">Are you sure?





Other lightinings:
http://www.wetter-foto.de/fotos-1-1-all-Blitze.html
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Interesting photos...I was in an airplane once taking photos of lightning and the 2nd photo reminds me of one similar that I took...(of course, the other passengers thought I was weird as they were scared just a tadbit..hehe):D

Also, Alberto, thanks for the link as I was about to do some research on the web for some photos of ligthning...now I have several to choose from! Kisses!:)
"Just Me, Lo" Loretta
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #8 on: 02/11/2007 22:01:27 »
I am not sure if i can write this, so that it makes sense to anyone, but i will try.

To start with, cloud to cloud (CC) lightning is not that rare at all. Possibly 1 in 4 of all lightning is CC, it is just that you do not notice it very well.

What we normally think of as lightning, cloud to ground, occurs when you have the negative cloud base and a positively charged ground, I'm sure we all know this.

What happens in CC lightning is that the lightning is caused by the top of the storm cloud, which is positively charged, and the bottom of another cloud which is negatively charged.

One characteristic of a CC cloud, that you will have noticed is the noise their thunder makes. The long, low rumbling thunder is generally caused by cc clouds as opposed to the large cracking noise made by cloud to ground thunder.

does that make sense? some things are easier to know, that put to "paper"

I agree with Paul as my experience here in Humboldt County is that I have stayed outside during many thunderstorms, and for here where I am, the majority of what I see are cloud to cloud rather then vertical strikes.. he is also right about the sound.. it is distinctly different and longer!

I love thunder and lightening and would have loved to have seen The double rainbow with the lightening striking  acros it like that! As for a possible religious omen, if thats what you mean... I really cannot take that as such.. I have never heard of it as being a sign of things to come... Would you mind pming me as to what you meant by that limpet chicken...?

By The way welcome to the forum and I love the name it reminds me of DON KNOX... "The incredible Mr. Limpet" and "The Ghost and MR.Chicken" LOL...

Please message me about what you were thinking!
 

Offline Alandriel

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 522
  • Thanked: 2 times
    • View Profile
    • Some of my photography
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #9 on: 02/11/2007 22:11:37 »
Karen - sorry, this is my confusion. I dug out an old thread. Limpet chicken shows a last active date 04 February 2005 - I don't think he/she'll be sending you PMs. As to biblical refs (and I am far, very far from being an expert) maybe he/she meant lightening as a manifestation of God's wrath. here are some refs and quotes.

Sorry - again. I searched for horizontal lightening and saw this thread... and then could not help myself

Quote from: paul
One characteristic of a CC cloud, that you will have noticed is the noise their thunder makes. The long, low rumbling thunder is generally caused by cc clouds as opposed to the large cracking noise made by cloud to ground thunder.

My observation too.


Like Karen - I *LOVE* thunder and lighening - the 'charge' in the air (ionization?? - I so have no proper grounding in this subject it's sad!) makes me feel ALIVE  ;D


« Last Edit: 02/11/2007 22:15:41 by Alandriel »
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #10 on: 02/11/2007 22:13:18 »
Karen, you may notice that i have just edited my post. I stupidly wrote "cloud" instead of "thunder" in places...long day...
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #11 on: 02/11/2007 22:36:30 »
Alandriel, i agree. Thunder and lightning are wonderous, but so are clouds. Todays sky, was amazing...
 

Offline Alandriel

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 522
  • Thanked: 2 times
    • View Profile
    • Some of my photography
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #12 on: 26/11/2007 22:05:52 »
Just came across this

A stroke of lightning discharges from 10 to 100 million volts & 30,000 amperes of electricity.

A bolt of lightning is about 54,000F (30,000C); six times hotter than the Sun.


Wouldn't it be great to be able to tap into all this energy? Why haven't we done that yet?
 

lyner

  • Guest
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #13 on: 26/11/2007 23:57:14 »
Lots of people have tried. A lot of them are either dead or had their equipment blown up. Ben Franklin was remarkably lucky with his particular (famous) experiment.
This energy , of course, comes from wind and weather, in the first place. We are developing some neat ways of using those two - wind turbines and hydro electric. Much more manageable.
 

Offline Dick1038

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 56
    • View Profile
Horizontal lightening
« Reply #14 on: 28/11/2007 19:50:25 »
It is not wise to be out in the open during an electrical storm.  Just a few weeks ago, the TV news program had a story of a man was walking outside.  The sky was cloudless except way off in the distance.  Well, the lightning bolt can out of the ground, fried his leg then out his head.  He survived without any brain damage.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Horizontal lightening
« Reply #14 on: 28/11/2007 19:50:25 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums