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Author Topic: Is it true that Earth's gravity is less at the equator?  (Read 8784 times)

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Is it true that Earth's gravity is less at the equator?
« Reply #25 on: 03/10/2008 07:05:54 »
I'm bored to the core myself. I'll leave you all to your laughable tittle-tattle and publish a scientific paper instead. Bye. It's been fun.
My guess is that that post will be wrong on all 4 counts.
 

Offline niall

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Re: Is it true that Earth's gravity is less at the equator?
« Reply #26 on: 03/10/2008 11:06:59 »
OK - sure, centrafugal force is greater at the equator and this acts in the opposite direction to weight (centrafugal not centrapetal, right?) I totally accept that. One anal point I would make is that this (technically) doesn't affect the gravitational force - the gravity is still there its just the cetrafugal force acts in the opposite direction i.e. you weigh less.
But the spin of the Earth will make it squat because of this, like spinning a balloon full of water. The gravitational pull of the sun and moon distort the shape of the Earth and give actual solid ground tides of ~20cm. So what I'm saying is that the Earth is a lot more pliable than we think...
Just had a thought. If you spin a water balloon it isn't less dense at the "equator" is it. It just squashes down and redistributes its mass...hmm curios. I guess I didn't have it quite right before. It may be less dense at the equator but probably not. But (as I think a lot of you have said, just differently...
If you shrank the Earth  down to the size of a football, keeping the same mass, and then stood in space where the old equator used to be and where the old north pole used to be, you'd be closer to the foorball at the north pole so gravity would be greater.
 

lyner

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Is it true that Earth's gravity is less at the equator?
« Reply #27 on: 03/10/2008 18:02:39 »
Given a few hundred million years and a steady force acting on it, even the stiff old Lithosphere will move eventually. The stuff underneath behaves like a liquid - convection currents are constantly sloshing material around.
The present shape is the 'equilibrium condition' with the gravitational  imbalance being equal to the rotational force. It shouldn't be too hard to work it out - if I could be **sed.
 

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Is it true that Earth's gravity is less at the equator?
« Reply #27 on: 03/10/2008 18:02:39 »

 

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