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Author Topic: A helium fusion bomb?  (Read 10311 times)

Offline Alan McDougall

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A helium fusion bomb?
« on: 20/10/2008 12:08:41 »
Hi,

Would a helium fusion bomb release more energy than a hydrogen bomb?

Alan


 

lyner

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #1 on: 20/10/2008 18:45:37 »
What would your helium fuse to make, Lithium, Carbon12?
 

Offline Freeman

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #2 on: 20/10/2008 22:07:53 »
Yes it will Alan.

And as Sophiecentaur stated the major problem in this system is that Helium is a inert gas.The products that is needed to make the fusion proses with Helium functional is problematic.

Also for this fusion proses to begin you run into the inherit problem of how do you start it to begin with.As I have it the means necessary to do this is physically almost impossible   
 

Offline Alan McDougall

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #3 on: 21/10/2008 04:41:09 »
Freeman,

Quote
Yes it will Alan.

And as Sophiecentaur stated the major problem in this system is that Helium is a inert gas.The products that is needed to make the fusion proses with Helium functional is problematic.

Also for this fusion proses to begin you run into the inherit problem of how do you start it to begin with.As I have it the means necessary to do this is physically almost impossible

Thanks for the replies guys. Well as I am sure you know this process of fusion, starts up in the sun and once it has exhausted all its hydrogen fusion, it then uses Helium fusion, carbon, oxygen,  fusion, an so on, for energy until the sun has used up all its fusion material and only iron is left. Iron cannot be atomically fused into more dense elements in a secondary star like ours. As far as I know and I stand corrected. "Iron can only be fused in a Supernova" (but here I am guessing)

When it reaches the iron fusion barrier our sun will first expand perhaps beyond the orbit of Mars and then collapse under the immense force off gravity. And so on and so.

From then on gravity will fuel its dying embers




"I know I am preaching to the converted." But two minds do not equal four but sixteen

The helium bomb in my humble opinion is feasible and maybe it could be ignited by a "hydrogen bomb fuse" which would have sufficient energy to fuel helium into carbon and oxygen, releasing colossal energy on anyone unlucky to be in its vicinity

That is my take on it, what do you think and have scientists, physicist have thought of this possibility? E=mc(2) and this applies to any element

Alan

 

lyner

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #4 on: 21/10/2008 10:38:52 »
The inertness of Helium is not relevant - we're talking about nuclear not chemical reactions.
The conventional Fusion bomb uses Hydrogen nuclei - but not the 1H nuclei (protons) which dominate. This would take far too long and there would be no useful energy available for Earthbound use. Deuterium (2H) and Tritium (3H) isotopes are fused together, instead because this reaction is much more probable. They have to be extracted from tons and tons of water, first.

The Heluim nuclei 4He which result (Alpha particles) fuse together in stars and form 12C nuclei. The process releases energy but afaik it takes a lot more time and may not be suited to 'bomb' use.
 

Offline Alan McDougall

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #5 on: 21/10/2008 15:31:21 »
sofiecentaur

Quote
The inertness of Helium is not relevant - we're talking about nuclear not chemical reactions.
The conventional Fusion bomb uses Hydrogen nuclei - but not the 1H nuclei (protons) which dominate. This would take far too long and there would be no useful energy available for Earthbound use. Deuterium (2H) and Tritium (3H) isotopes are fused together, instead because this reaction is much more probable. They have to be extracted from tons and tons of water, first.

This threads was started specifically with a "helium fusion bomb in mind". Not "commercial helium fission" I agree that to try and use "helium fission" would not be  viable commercial or produce any meaningful energy

But sufficient helium or the helium isotope could easily be extracted from the ocean as you suggested , but only limited quantities would be needed for my hypothetical helium bomb. To achieve this we must start with "plutonium fission", which would in turn ignite, hydrogen fusion, which in turn ignite the composite "helium bomb"

Alan
 

Offline lightarrow

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #6 on: 21/10/2008 16:04:11 »
Why then not to fuse two aluminum nuclei to form an iron nucleus?

27Al + 27Al --> 54Fe

27Al is the most abundant stable isotope of aluminum; it has 13 protons and 14 neutrons; 54Fe is a stable isotope of iron, its abundance is about 6% of all the iron atoms; it has 26 protons and 28 neutrons.
 

blakestyger

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #7 on: 21/10/2008 16:09:32 »
Would a helium fusion bomb release more energy than a hydrogen bomb?

How far from East Anglia do you live - should I be concerned? :o
 

Offline lightarrow

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #8 on: 21/10/2008 16:32:30 »
Would a helium fusion bomb release more energy than a hydrogen bomb?

How far from East Anglia do you live - should I be concerned? :o

;D
 

Offline Alan McDougall

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #9 on: 21/10/2008 19:01:21 »

Quote
Quote from: Alan McDougall on 20/10/2008 12:08:41
Would a helium fusion bomb release more energy than a hydrogen bomb?


How far from East Anglia do you live - should I be concerned
?

Definitely not it just will not happen  and my comment about helium fission is silly,  ::)Fission is only viable in heavy elements like plutonium as I am sure you all know.

If you are in East  Anglia in a few billion years when the sun begins to "burn" helium you will be in real trouble   [:o)]

Alan
 

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A helium fusion bomb?
« Reply #9 on: 21/10/2008 19:01:21 »

 

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