The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: How often are robotic surgeries performed and what kinds are done these days?  (Read 3144 times)

Offline Karen W.

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
I was just curious as I have been doing some reading and stumbled on a procedure that is performed via a robot.. incisions stitching etc.. the whole procedure as far as I could see!

Does anyone have any information on these things, reliability etc..???


 

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8131
  • Thanked: 53 times
    • View Profile
The robot is not automated, it is being operated by a surgeon, who need not be in the same room (or country) as the patient.

Quote
Robotic telemanipulation systems were introduced during the last decade of the 20th century. They were developed to support surgeons during endoscopic procedures, in which visualisation and manipulation are reduced as compared to traditional “open” surgery...

The digital processing allows the scalingdown of the surgeon’s hand movements to a level where micro-vascular procedures are feasible. The ergonomic and reduced fatigue features will be a great advantage.The first operation reported using a robotic telemanipulation system was a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed on 3 March 1997 at the St Pierre Hospital in Brussels, Belgium 10. Others have followed in the last few years, not only in general surgery but also in cardiac surgery, gynaecology and in urology. More than 1000* procedures have now been performed with the da Vinci system and almost the same number with the Zeus. Instruments are being installed in hospitals in Europe and the US.
http://igitur-archive.library.uu.nl/dissertations/2004-0107-101406/full.pdf

*2002 statistics.

When the surgeon is in another country I hope they have a reliable internet connection  :) .
« Last Edit: 28/10/2008 11:15:41 by RD »
 

lyner

  • Guest
The term 'robot' isn't really appropriate, I think. The operations are carried out using 'remote manipulators', driven by a surgeon afaik. I don't think they would trust a robot to make life and death decisions in the middle of a surgical procedure.
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
The robot is not automated, it is being operated by a surgeon, who need not be in the same room (or country) as the patient.

Quote
Robotic telemanipulation systems were introduced during the last decade of the 20th century. They were developed to support surgeons during endoscopic procedures, in which visualisation and manipulation are reduced as compared to traditional “open” surgery...

The digital processing allows the scalingdown of the surgeon’s hand movements to a level where micro-vascular procedures are feasible. The ergonomic and reduced fatigue features will be a great advantage.The first operation reported using a robotic telemanipulation system was a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed on 3 March 1997 at the St Pierre Hospital in Brussels, Belgium 10. Others have followed in the last few years, not only in general surgery but also in cardiac surgery, gynaecology and in urology. More than 1000* procedures have now been performed with the da Vinci system and almost the same number with the Zeus. Instruments are being installed in hospitals in Europe and the US.
http://igitur-archive.library.uu.nl/dissertations/2004-0107-101406/full.pdf

*2002 statistics.

When the surgeon is in another country I hope they have a reliable internet connection  :) .

Thank you Rd...That really doe amaze me.. Just twenty years ago Or so.. I would never have thought they would ever really be able to use thi technology with any real success....

You mentioned the connection.... Seriously what would they do if the connection went down...I know there would be other Doctors to step in or phone or something.. but it seems risky to me!
 

The Naked Scientists Forum


 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums