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Author Topic: Re-enforced metal  (Read 2889 times)

Offline Titanscape

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Re-enforced metal
« on: 05/03/2005 14:35:23 »
We re-enforce concrete with steel but how about strengthening steel blades in fencing with 10cm lengths of ceramic fibres. Added while the metal while molten. It would mean that the blades would not break in two, safer then. Leon Paul said they considered this but that it was rejected. Any ideas?

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Offline neilep

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Re: Re-enforced metal
« Reply #1 on: 05/03/2005 18:06:00 »
Do you know why it was rejected Bren ?

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Offline chimera

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Re: Re-enforced metal
« Reply #2 on: 05/03/2005 19:04:00 »
I know that those ceramic blades chip and shatter, as the old saying from Dune goes. Drop one on a tile floor, and you might as well get out the brush and pan...

I think the same would apply to the ceramic reinforcement up to a point... heavy vibrations as in fencing (Leon Paul) might make it come apart too, maybe .
 

Offline gsmollin

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Re: Re-enforced metal
« Reply #3 on: 07/03/2005 02:33:47 »
It's called a metal matrix composite material. This kind of composite can be made to have many strange and wonderful characteristics, like a directional thermal conductivity. I don't know about fencing foils. Ceramics are not good candidates for the composite, because they have poor tensile strength.
 

sharkeyandgeorge

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Re: Re-enforced metal
« Reply #4 on: 07/03/2005 12:11:58 »
Metals are not my field of expertise but similar ideas are already used in concrete in constuction where glass fibres are used to increase tesile strngth instead of traditional agregate. This technology would not work in metals as the melting point is to high but how about super high temp plastics as currently being used in next gen weapons?.
 

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Re: Re-enforced metal
« Reply #4 on: 07/03/2005 12:11:58 »

 

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