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Author Topic: Why would a blood sample turn pink with centrifugation?  (Read 3293 times)

Offline Squeak

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I'm faced with a pretty difficult question for an assessment. Basically, if I were to take a patient's blood sample, mix it with an isotonic solution and centrifuge it and it came out looking pink and straw like, what would cause this?

I was thinking perhaps the red blood cells absorbed too much water and burst, but this would not be the case seeing as the isotonic solution obviously allows osmosis yet prevents diffusion.

I think that the answers are pertaining to some sorts of diseases... any help welcomed, kudos for references.

Shane.
« Last Edit: 08/12/2008 20:59:10 by chris »


 

Offline RD

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Re: Why would a blood sample turn pink with centrifugation?
« Reply #1 on: 02/12/2008 05:20:19 »
Hemolysis can be caused in-vitro by too high centrifuge rpm, or centrifuging for too long.
« Last Edit: 02/12/2008 05:22:01 by RD »
 

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Re: Why would a blood sample turn pink with centrifugation?
« Reply #1 on: 02/12/2008 05:20:19 »

 

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