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Author Topic: What Plant should I choose for my Hedge?  (Read 3995 times)

the grouve

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What Plant should I choose for my Hedge?
« on: 07/12/2008 06:35:24 »
I wish to plant a hedge, I am in South India, which would be the best plant to use?

I would like it to grow to around 7-foot high, and be around 100 meters long. Quick growing would be very appreciated.
 
Any ideas?
« Last Edit: 10/12/2008 13:25:14 by BenV »


 

Offline Don_1

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Re: What Plant should I choose for my Hedge?
« Reply #1 on: 07/12/2008 10:56:17 »
Pyracantha. Native to south east Asia. Some will grow to 6m high, but they can be pruned. Has very sharp, long spikes. Flowering evergreen with autumn/winter berries.

Berberis. Some species also native to Asia. Very similar to the Pyracantha but smaller, with shorter spikes. Flowering deciduous and evergreen varieties. Autumn/winter/spring berries. Some berries have culinary and/or medicinal uses.

Both of these make good protective hedging due to the multitude of spikes, are good for decoration, supply a vast quantity of berries (good for birds) are fairly fast growing and can be pruned without damage to the plant.
 

the grouve

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Re: What Plant should I choose for my Hedge?
« Reply #2 on: 10/12/2008 12:53:50 »
Pyracantha. Native to south east Asia. Some will grow to 6m high, but they can be pruned. Has very sharp, long spikes. Flowering evergreen with autumn/winter berries.

Berberis. Some species also native to Asia. Very similar to the Pyracantha but smaller, with shorter spikes. Flowering deciduous and evergreen varieties. Autumn/winter/spring berries. Some berries have culinary and/or medicinal uses.

Both of these make good protective hedging due to the multitude of spikes, are good for decoration, supply a vast quantity of berries (good for birds) are fairly fast growing and can be pruned without damage to the plant.

Thankyou Don. I also want to plant a nice hedge, that doesn't have thorns, what's the best bet?
 

Offline Don_1

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What Hedge?
« Reply #3 on: 10/12/2008 13:30:41 »
Euonymus

Some species native to East Asia. Flowering evergreen (although I think there are one or two deciduous species, these may be the European varieties), with autumn/winter berries. Good for birds, but the plant & berries are toxic to humans.

I'm not too sure of the suitability to your climate of all varieties. Look for those native to Australia and Madagascar. Can be pruned without trouble, but these are not such fast growers as the Berberis & Pyracantha.

Will put on the thinking cap to see if I can come up with anything else.
 

Offline dentstudent

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What Plant should I choose for my Hedge?
« Reply #4 on: 10/12/2008 13:54:44 »
Does Oleander grow well down there?


Oleander grows well in warm subtropical regions, where it is extensively used as an ornamental plant in landscapes, parks, and along roadsides. It is drought tolerant and will tolerate occasional light frost down to -10C, 14F [1]. It is commonly used as a decorative freeway median in California and other mild-winter states in the Continental United States because deer will not eat it due to its high toxicity, it is tolerant of a variety of poor soils, and drought tolerant. It can also be grown in cooler climates in greenhouses and conservatories, or as indoor plants that can be kept outside in the summer. Oleander flowers are showy and fragrant and are grown for these reasons. Over 400 cultivars have been named, with several additional flower colours not found in wild plants having been selected, including red, purple, pink and orange; white and a variety of pinks are the most common. Many cultivars also have double flowers. Young plants grow best in spaces where they do not have to compete with other plants for nutrients.

Wikipedia - Oleander
« Last Edit: 10/12/2008 13:58:30 by dentstudent »
 

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What Plant should I choose for my Hedge?
« Reply #5 on: 10/12/2008 13:58:58 »
Escallonia

Another flowering evergreen which I think is native to Sth. America. Fairly fast growing and can be pruned. Reasonably tollerant plant.

Other than these, the only others I can think of may not be tollerant of your conditions, or need a good deal of attention. eg. Shrub Rose (low growing), Ilex, Prunus.
 

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What Plant should I choose for my Hedge?
« Reply #6 on: 10/12/2008 14:10:41 »
Does Oleander grow well down there?


Oleander grows well in warm subtropical regions, where it is extensively used as an ornamental plant in landscapes, parks, and along roadsides. It is drought tolerant and will tolerate occasional light frost down to -10C, 14F [1]. It is commonly used as a decorative freeway median in California and other mild-winter states in the Continental United States because deer will not eat it due to its high toxicity, it is tolerant of a variety of poor soils, and drought tolerant. It can also be grown in cooler climates in greenhouses and conservatories, or as indoor plants that can be kept outside in the summer. Oleander flowers are showy and fragrant and are grown for these reasons. Over 400 cultivars have been named, with several additional flower colours not found in wild plants having been selected, including red, purple, pink and orange; white and a variety of pinks are the most common. Many cultivars also have double flowers. Young plants grow best in spaces where they do not have to compete with other plants for nutrients.

Wikipedia - Oleander

Would probably be OK, but it is not generally used as hedging. I'm not sure it would look so good after pruning and may not like to be pruned too often.

Another couple of possibilities are Viburnham and Spiraea.
« Last Edit: 12/12/2008 11:35:54 by Don_1 »
 

the grouve

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What Plant should I choose for my Hedge?
« Reply #7 on: 12/12/2008 10:31:20 »
Thanks for all your help, I'm building a Nursery so I'll probably try them all in different places.

Not sure about using non-native plants though; could be quite damaging.
 

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What Plant should I choose for my Hedge?
« Reply #7 on: 12/12/2008 10:31:20 »

 

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