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Author Topic: What's the hottest temperature water than most people can stand?  (Read 5663 times)

DoctorBeaver

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I've noticed that I can do washing-up in much hotter water than Sandra. I guess that's to do with my skin being harder than hers. But it got me wondering - what is the hottest that most people can take?

TECHFACTOR

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 Hey Doc.TECHFACTOR: I happen to have some input on this subject. Of course I know that you know that the danger of A fever is that the brain begins too boil in it's own juices at 105 degrees. So if through the temp.of water you increased your core temp.or even just your head above 105 degrees this could be fatal.Anything touching the outside skin of 105 or more will start to burn. Some people have acclimated there skin by ritual exposure and built personal tolerances. So the specific degree varies.Having A high pain threshold doesn't hurt as well... hope this helps. TECHFACTOR:OUT 

Don_1

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I only know that my Mrs has bath water so hot, it could make soup out of me!!!

DoctorBeaver

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TECHFACTOR - I assume you mean 105C. I've been in temperatures of more than 105F many times.

Bored chemist

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There's a difference between being in air at 105 F which is warmer tha I'd like, but perfectly survivable (with enough salt and water to make up for the sweating) and hving a core temperaure of 105F which would be a seriously bad fever (we are talking "call an ambulance and get them to hospital" bad).

In my experience you can pick stuff up at 50 C and carry it about. At 60 C you can pick it up, but only for long enough to put it down again. Much hotter than that and, if you pick it up, you drop it.
Other people's tollerance will almost certainly differ. Also it's interesting to note that people can drink coffee from cups that are too hot to hold. The mouth has a lot of blood vessels that can carry away the heat quickly.

DoctorBeaver

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BC - I had a temperature of 104F when I caught a fever in Uganda. I wasn't very well for a while  :P

paul.fr

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Isn't domestic tap water limited to a max. temp. of 60c? If so, then somewhere around that mark would be a good start.

DoctorBeaver

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60oC was the max in the hospital I was in so that could well be.

lyner

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There is a 'health and safety' dilemma.
You have to store water hot enough to kill off Legionella but cool enough not to scald people. What should you do?

Madidus_Scientia

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What about a hot water system that kept a smaller tank of water hotter than is safe, that would definitely kill legionella, but then mixed the water with an amount of cold water to bring it back to safe temperature as it is being used?

Bored chemist

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There is a 'health and safety' dilemma.
You have to store water hot enough to kill off Legionella but cool enough not to scald people. What should you do?
Use mixer taps.

 

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