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Author Topic: where did that saying come from?  (Read 9644 times)

paul.fr

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where did that saying come from?
« on: 11/12/2008 22:46:47 »
Have you heard a saying or phrase and wondered where it originated? Well why not have the clever clogs of the forum fill you in!

to start off:

where did this saying originate:

"she was so ugly that when she was a kid, her mummy had to tie pork chops around her neck so that the dog would play with her". I heard this today for the first time and it made me chuckle.


 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #1 on: 11/12/2008 23:00:30 »
I first heard that said by Les Dawson.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #2 on: 11/12/2008 23:01:05 »
A saying that has always baffled me is "Well I'll go to the foot of our stairs". What's all that about?
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #3 on: 11/12/2008 23:30:44 »
A saying that has always baffled me is "Well I'll go to the foot of our stairs". What's all that about?
In what context was that said?
 

Offline turnipsock

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« Reply #4 on: 12/12/2008 00:45:20 »
I'm sure there is a book about all this sort of stuff. It was mentioned on the Fred MacAully program recently.
 

Offline RD

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« Reply #5 on: 12/12/2008 01:11:19 »
This sounds a plausible explanation for "Well I'll go to the foot of our stairs" ...

Quote
My understanding of it is that the person has just heard an amazing piece of information which is so important that it needs to be communicated immediately to the other people in the household (who happen to be upstairs). Therefore you go to the foot of the stairs in order to shout it up to the others so that they can hear.
http://www.theanswerbank.co.uk/Phrases-and-Sayings/Question13527.html
 

Offline LeeE

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« Reply #6 on: 12/12/2008 02:16:32 »
The 'foot' of something can be equated with the 'root' or origin of something.
 

Offline Don_1

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #7 on: 12/12/2008 09:33:53 »
The one that has always confused me is, after being told a piece of gossip people will say 'well I never' or 'well I never did'.

But the one I like is the exclamation 'Gordon Bennett'. There are many different ideas on where and how this originated including the most popularly accepted James Gordon Bennett. But the one I prefer is that off the Sheffield WW1 RAF pilot who after the war took to performing aerial acrobatics. His 'pièce de résistance ' being his flight through a barn, open at both ends, to which the audience would exclaim 'Gordon Bennett!'
 

Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #8 on: 12/12/2008 09:43:47 »
I heard that Gordon Bennett was an eccentric who used to go into restaurants and pull off the table cloths of other diners' tables. It was locally known that he did this, and when he was seen, people would say "Gordon Bennett!". I think that this is from one of Bill Bryson's books, perhaps "Made in America".
 

blakestyger

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #9 on: 12/12/2008 12:55:04 »
The one that has always confused me is, after being told a piece of gossip people will say 'well I never' or 'well I never did'.

This is a shortened form of 'Well I never heard (did hear) anything like that before'
 

paul.fr

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #10 on: 12/12/2008 13:09:23 »
What about "Jesus H Christ!" why is the H in there?
 

Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #11 on: 12/12/2008 13:16:00 »
his middle name was Houdini. How do you think he got out of that cave?
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #12 on: 12/12/2008 13:38:25 »
What about "Jesus H Christ!" why is the H in there?

I was just about to ask that!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #13 on: 12/12/2008 13:41:59 »
This sounds a plausible explanation for "Well I'll go to the foot of our stairs" ...

Quote
My understanding of it is that the person has just heard an amazing piece of information which is so important that it needs to be communicated immediately to the other people in the household (who happen to be upstairs). Therefore you go to the foot of the stairs in order to shout it up to the others so that they can hear.
http://www.theanswerbank.co.uk/Phrases-and-Sayings/Question13527.html


Why not just say "I'll have to tell the others"? Or what if they were in the garden?
 

Offline RD

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« Reply #14 on: 12/12/2008 14:04:53 »
Christogram, (no not a Jesus impersonator who delivers a messsage), his logo ...

 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #15 on: 12/12/2008 14:09:25 »
Christogram - I've just pictured a stripping Jesus delivering a birthday message  ;D
 

Offline RD

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« Reply #16 on: 12/12/2008 14:13:46 »
Why not just say "I'll have to tell the others"? Or what if they were in the garden?

I think the phrase would have originated in communities where they did not have a garden,
(e.g. "Coronation Street" type 2up-2down houses).
 

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« Reply #17 on: 12/12/2008 14:16:15 »
OK then - why not "I'll go to the front door and tell the whole bloody street"!
 

Offline RD

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« Reply #18 on: 12/12/2008 14:34:41 »
...tell the whole bloody street

I think that expression is reserved for embarrassing information which one would rather not leave the home.

 

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« Reply #19 on: 12/12/2008 15:01:24 »
...tell the whole bloody street

I think that expression is reserved for embarrassing information which one would rather not leave the home.



Too late. I've been on to The News Of The World.
 

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« Reply #20 on: 12/12/2008 16:17:12 »
The one that has always confused me is, after being told a piece of gossip people will say 'well I never' or 'well I never did'.

This is a shortened form of 'Well I never heard (did hear) anything like that before'

Well I never did!!! Thank you. It's quite obvious now have pointed that out.
 

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« Reply #21 on: 12/12/2008 16:18:39 »
Now, what about, 'I'll be a monkey's uncle'?
 

blakestyger

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #22 on: 12/12/2008 16:29:29 »
It means 'that can't be true'. I'll wager a pound to a yard of tripe that it dates from the controversy following the Origin of Species in 1859 - or perhaps the Scopes trial era, 1920s.
 

Offline elegantlywasted

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« Reply #23 on: 12/12/2008 16:38:40 »
Now, what about, 'I'll be a monkey's uncle'?

No idea about this one but it makes me think of "Bob's your uncle"... Who's Bob?
 

Offline rosy

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« Reply #24 on: 12/12/2008 16:52:26 »
I don't know what the origins of saying "Gordon Bennet" are, but I suspect it's persisted because people start saying "Oh Go..." and then remember that there are children/ladies/ministers present and divert from the coming blasphemy to something less contentious. As for "Oh s..ugar!" and "Oh f..lipping heck".
 

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #24 on: 12/12/2008 16:52:26 »

 

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