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Author Topic: where did that saying come from?  (Read 9657 times)

blakestyger

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #25 on: 12/12/2008 17:00:05 »
No idea about this one but it makes me think of "Bob's your uncle"... Who's Bob?

When Prime Minister Lord (Robert) Salisbury made his nephew (Balfour) up to a senior government post in Ireland in 1887 it was seen as nepotism. It's possible that 'Bob's your uncle' referred to this kind of easy passage into high office, or a good life.
That doesn't explain 'Fanny's your aunt' though.
 

paul.fr

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #26 on: 12/12/2008 17:19:40 »
wAHT ABOUT, Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey?
 

Offline Don_1

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #27 on: 12/12/2008 17:50:22 »
Speaking of Fanny, one of the best unintentional lines was by Johnny Craddock (for the US Fanny & Johnny Craddock were early TV celebtity cooks, Fanny did the cooking while Johnny passed things to her and swigged at the cooking sherry).

After making some doughnuts (dohnuts) Fanny showed them to camera and Johnny said "I hope your doughnuts turn out like Fannies".
 

blakestyger

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #28 on: 12/12/2008 18:29:46 »
LOL doughnuts like Fannies ;D

On HMS Victory you can see canon balls stacked pyramidally on a ring of brass (a monkey) on the deck to the side of the gun's trucks. The explanation is that in cold weather it would shrink and tip the ordinance off.

There are problems with this account, apparently to do with brass not contracting enough to cause this and the original phrase being recorded as freezing the tail off a brass monkey. I'll add another to that - there was already a monkey on board eighteenth-century ships of the line; boys sent to the magazines for fresh supplies in battle were called 'powder monkeys'.
« Last Edit: 13/12/2008 09:45:54 by blakestyger »
 

Offline elegantlywasted

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #29 on: 13/12/2008 02:04:54 »
No idea about this one but it makes me think of "Bob's your uncle"... Who's Bob?

When Prime Minister Lord (Robert) Salisbury made his nephew (Balfour) up to a senior government post in Ireland in 1887 it was seen as nepotism. It's possible that 'Bob's your uncle' referred to this kind of easy passage into high office, or a good life.
That doesn't explain 'Fanny's your aunt' though.

Thanks blakestyger!
 

Offline LeeE

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #30 on: 13/12/2008 13:26:03 »
Quote
I hope your doughnuts turn out like Fannies

Then there was the cricket commentator who came up with the line:

"The batsman's Holding, the Bowler's Willy"

 

Offline dentstudent

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #31 on: 15/12/2008 08:22:03 »
wAHT ABOUT, Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey?

I think that this is a nautical term - the balls are cannon balls, and the brass monkey was a small cannon. I think.
 

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where did that saying come from?
« Reply #31 on: 15/12/2008 08:22:03 »

 

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