The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Is this possible? (kitchen science)  (Read 11367 times)

Offline JnA

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1093
  • Stunt Scientist
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« on: 26/12/2008 10:20:31 »



I think a person wouldn't be able to exhale hard enough to get such a strong flow...


 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #1 on: 26/12/2008 11:24:17 »
Well... perhaps if they did it in one big burst
 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #2 on: 26/12/2008 11:25:04 »
Either that or the woman has incredibly big and powerful lungs.
 

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8125
  • Thanked: 53 times
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #3 on: 26/12/2008 18:23:32 »
I bet she won't be allowed in that tea-shop again  :)


Now these are powerful lungs: blowing up a hot water bottle til it bursts ... http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=R3aQdh1QfHo
 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #4 on: 26/12/2008 22:33:10 »
WOW! Thats amazing!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #5 on: 26/12/2008 22:39:08 »
I wonder if she can inflate a hot water bottle like that too.

Here's a story about a man who can inflate them using his nose!  [:0]
 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #6 on: 26/12/2008 23:15:33 »
Now there are some powerful lungs, not to mention the diaphram muscle and intercoastal muscles!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #7 on: 26/12/2008 23:26:13 »
I struggle to inflate a paper bag  :(
 

Offline JnA

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1093
  • Stunt Scientist
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #8 on: 26/12/2008 23:46:24 »
The hot water bottle was impressive.. but I still think I could do that over the tea pot thing...   I might go a find myself a teapot... (short and stout)
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #9 on: 26/12/2008 23:58:24 »
Could be interesting if the tealeaves get stuck in the spout  ;D
 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #10 on: 27/12/2008 08:25:08 »
I might go a find myself a teapot... (short and stout)
It might depend on whether you can get your mouth to the (what do you call that thing???) end of the pouring thing. That way you can blow on it like through a straw.
 

Offline Seany

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4209
  • Live your life to the full!
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #11 on: 05/01/2009 23:19:09 »
I bet she won't be allowed in that tea-shop again  :)


Now these are powerful lungs: blowing up a hot water bottle til it bursts ... http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=R3aQdh1QfHo

That is so unreal!! Wow..
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #12 on: 06/01/2009 21:26:10 »
I am with Doc.. I haven't enough wind to blow up a bag either!

 My sons ears nose and Throat Doctor can
ow up Balloons and lots of oher odd things with his nostrils!!! It is so odd!
 

Offline wolfekeeper

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1092
  • Thanked: 11 times
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #13 on: 07/01/2009 00:56:18 »
According to my calculations she's making about 0.5 psi or something a bit more, it's nothing special- a normal party balloon is about 1.5 psi.

But why don't you guys actually try it? It's called ... science!
« Last Edit: 07/01/2009 01:01:47 by wolfekeeper »
 

Offline dentstudent

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3146
  • FOGger to the unsuspecting
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #14 on: 07/01/2009 08:43:50 »
It is a lot easier if the object that represents the "tea" is actually made of glass.....
 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #15 on: 07/01/2009 11:37:37 »
According to my calculations
How do you calculate something this?
 

Offline BenV

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1503
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #16 on: 07/01/2009 12:30:53 »
Okay - we'll kitchen science it.  I'll chat do dave about how we can do it without soaking our equipment though!

Edit - regardless of lung power, i expect that most teapots wouln't create such a neat and tidy stream - I expect I'll have to get wet trying.
« Last Edit: 07/01/2009 12:38:30 by BenV »
 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11993
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #17 on: 28/02/2009 14:30:47 »
Awh, I would trust our Wolfekeeper on that :) Mr Chem.
It should have to do with the amount of space inside that teapot and the length and diameter of that teapots 'pipe' I think? :)

But probably I'm missing out on some important factors..
On the other hand, it's probably just that kind of things that allows me to be soo 'free thinking' in my 'conclusions' ::))


--------
Btw: Is all female scientists as sweet looking as her.
I need a change of profession here:)

« Last Edit: 28/02/2009 14:34:22 by yor_on »
 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #18 on: 28/02/2009 23:18:17 »
She's not a scientist, she's just the tea lady! :)

------
With very big lungs.

------
And a whole lotta tea!  :)
« Last Edit: 28/02/2009 23:20:22 by Chemistry4me »
 

Offline rosy

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1018
  • Chemistry
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #19 on: 28/02/2009 23:27:42 »
Yeah, it works. I think you'd need to set the photo up a few times to get the jet going into the cup like that, but in principle it doesn't take all that much breath.
 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11993
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #20 on: 01/03/2009 11:27:37 »
Ah Rosy Rose, it's you then, is it? :)

Now Missus Rose, what i first noticed enjoying your picture was that 'burning determination' shown in your eyes, as you created that majestic pillar of water.

If 'looks could kill' then that teacup would have been decimated eons before.
And of course as Mr Chem ever so politely points out, the more than sufficient lung capacity shown here.

And now I will hide under my table again.
 

Offline wolfekeeper

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1092
  • Thanked: 11 times
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #21 on: 02/03/2009 17:02:52 »
According to my calculations
How do you calculate something this?
The maximum height is determined by the 'head'. You just need to estimate the height of the jet and then use that to calculate the head in terms of meters of water, the amount of head the lady supplies determines the maximum height it will spurt.

So in the picture the jet has gone less than a 0.3 m upwards; so you need a head pressure of 0.3m. One atmosphere is about 10m head (14.7 psi) so it's 0.3/10*14.7 =~ 0.5 psi.

There's also some losses due to viscosity of the liquids flow in the nozzle, I could calculate it, but the calculation is a bit messy, and that shouldn't be too bad at these low speeds.
« Last Edit: 06/03/2009 03:30:04 by wolfekeeper »
 

Offline wolfekeeper

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1092
  • Thanked: 11 times
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #22 on: 02/03/2009 17:11:37 »
Yeah, I just tried it in my shower... there's now a wet patch on the ceiling and my fringe is a bit damp. :D The biggest problem was sealing the teapot with my mouth. The other problem I had was the angle of the spout of the teapot I was using was a bit flat to get a really good height.
 

Offline Madidus_Scientia

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1451
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #23 on: 02/03/2009 17:59:22 »
Can you resistance-train your diaphram muscles?
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8659
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #24 on: 02/03/2009 19:32:07 »
The teapot is a red herring (possibly belonging to Mr Russel, but that's another story).
If you can spit a jet of water like that then there's not a lot of difference between doing so and blowing it out of the teapot.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Is this possible? (kitchen science)
« Reply #24 on: 02/03/2009 19:32:07 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
 
Login
Login with username, password and session length