The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: How much heat is produced reacting amorphous forms of carbon to CO?  (Read 2480 times)

Offline peppercorn

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1466
    • View Profile
    • solar
If, say, desulphurised coal is burnt in limited oxygen forming carbon monoxide - how much heat is released compared with full combustion to C02?

What I'm driving at is, rather than using our coal reserves to be fully burnt in power stations - could CO be exhausted & then reacted with some other mineral (limestone?) to 'fix' the CO in a solid or liquid form, so stopping escape into the atmosphere, but still getting some energy 'reward' from the coal?


 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
According to me old chemistry textbook:
C (s) + 0.5O2 (g) → CO (g)     releases 111kJ mol-1

and

C (s) + O2 (g) → CO2 (g)      releases 394kJ mol-1
 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
What I'm driving at is, rather than using our coal reserves to be fully burnt in power stations - could CO be exhausted & then reacted with some other mineral (limestone?) to 'fix' the CO in a solid or liquid form, so stopping escape into the atmosphere, but still getting some energy 'reward' from the coal?
What exactly do you have in mind?
 

Offline peppercorn

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1466
    • View Profile
    • solar
Thanks Chemistry4me!

I see from your textbook figures that my idea is not worth following up.
I had thought that if say half as much energy was released in forming CO w.r.t. CO2 then a reasonable efficient power-station could be conceived without releasing CO2 into the atmosphere.

I was simply following up a thought that the big problem with fossil-fuels burning is that they generate greenhouse gases (CO2 in the main). I thought, what if a highly exothermic reaction can be devised that starts with carbon-rich fuel (coal - we still have lots of that) - with the resultant by-product being non-gaseous?

Has anyone experimented with using coal or other ff's in this way?

I am also led to believe that, with the aid of catalysts, carbon can be encouraged to strip oxygen from water molecules.  As I see it, doing this would make sequestration easier than, 'cleaning up' a power-station smoke stack & offer large quantities of hydrogen for many applications - Personally I would like to see it used for upgrading biomass to liquid fuels.
« Last Edit: 03/01/2009 14:48:37 by peppercorn »
 

The Naked Scientists Forum


 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums