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Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #50 on: 06/01/2009 17:11:52 »
*Lifts hand up like a nice child to ask a question* ;D

How polite you Koreans are! We Brits would just say "Oi, I wanna ask ya a question Moosh" ;D
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #51 on: 06/01/2009 17:12:20 »
How can i say ''no'' to that?
 

Offline Seany

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« Reply #52 on: 06/01/2009 17:15:20 »
How can i say ''no'' to that?

Thank you for being so considerate ;)
 

Offline Seany

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« Reply #53 on: 06/01/2009 17:15:46 »
*Lifts hand up like a nice child to ask a question* ;D

How polite you Koreans are! We Brits would just say "Oi, I wanna ask ya a question Moosh" ;D

How nice of you to still remember my nationality ;D
Good memory!
 

Offline Madidus_Scientia

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« Reply #54 on: 06/01/2009 17:23:25 »
Quote
Criticism is fine, as i once said. But being ignorant towrds someone without proof is bad in itself.

The people who have criticised you have shown the opposite of ignorance, they have exercised critical thinking skills and have questioned your logic. If they were ignorant, they would have blindly taken what you said to be truth. You are the one being ignorant toward those who question you.


well, that's interesting, because I see it completely differently. As i said, there is criticism, and then there is just ignorance, and in this case, the ignorance was directed to impune my work, and me.

I can take criticism, but not if it has behind it bad intentions.

Where are the bad intentions?
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #55 on: 06/01/2009 17:31:46 »
Where are the good intentions in saying there is something potentially wrong in my taking work i have already written for the good of people learning?

Just drop it.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #56 on: 06/01/2009 17:45:51 »
*Lifts hand up like a nice child to ask a question* ;D

How polite you Koreans are! We Brits would just say "Oi, I wanna ask ya a question Moosh" ;D

How nice of you to still remember my nationality ;D
Good memory!

I've made a Korea out of remembering things  ;D
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #57 on: 06/01/2009 17:58:45 »
Mr S.
Relax, but prepare for questions and opinions:)
But that is as it should be...

After all, we all want it to be as 'right' as possible.
And nobody here is evil..

Ah, with the possible exception of that person in red over there, perhaps?
You know, the one with those two red pointy things.
what are they called?
Horns?

:)

Nah, relax and enjoy.
Some may expect a more stringent 'language' when describing an idea.

But when done as I do :)
They fast realize that the best they ever will get out of me is a..
'I know Noothing, noo thiing I say'.

Yep, brothers in arms, that's us, Manuel and me.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #58 on: 06/01/2009 18:03:34 »
Yes, i will relax. I also don't mind questions, but i don't want my teaching method questioned, because afterall, i don't see anyone else jumping to the opportunity to take time out of their day to go through, and to be honest, a very difficult area of science.
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #59 on: 06/01/2009 19:28:00 »
But they do Mr. S :)

In a 'laid back' manner perhaps.
But one of the main reasons, beyond the civility and knowledge shown around here, I enjoy this place is just that.
That here you will find people taking that 'extra step' to try to explain their thoughts in a comprehensible manner.
Lightarrow is my most recent example of a guy showing extraordinary patience with me, guiding me in how physics define and differ between different concepts.
What you are planning to do is the same :) but as a more concise 'treatise' relating to defined areas.

But in the end, I believe, it all comes down to our need to learn.

The more you use that mind the more you will find that you don't know anything.
At least that is how it feels for me :)
Then , on the other tentacle, in my case it might be all too true::))

When you find that you suddenly understand something, that you had problems coming to grip with before.
That's the best kick there are.

Yep, Knowledge should be free, and here I think it is.
(Although it may cost one some 'sweat' coming to 'terms' with it, ah, that new knowledge i meant:)
« Last Edit: 06/01/2009 22:25:34 by yor_on »
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #60 on: 06/01/2009 19:32:58 »
Forgive me, i meant lessons, not participatory means, which people here do take their time out of to do.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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« Reply #61 on: 06/01/2009 19:44:15 »
I have no criticism of good explanations containing accurate examples at an understandable level for the questioner and work hard to do this when asked.  Can I point out though that on both of the two sites where I found identical postings to what Mr Scientist posted here containing identical errors the (differently named) posters had been banned from the site, presumably for posting poor quality scientific information.  Also I have been active as a moderator on open chat sites of many different types ever since the web was invented and Mr Scientist's aggression, fear of criticism and pleading as a victim are totally characteristic of the behaviour of that loathsome species the internet Troll.

Mr Scientist there is still time to mend your ways with this site if you concentrate on polite and accurate scientific discussion you might even learn some science.  But for someone who apparently does not understand (or pretends not to understand) how a filament light bulb works.  (see      )  offering to teach others seems a bit unwise.

Mind you it is amazing the poor quality teaching that exists in some schools these days because it was only a couple of years ago that we had a young person on this site who had been told that the electrons round the nucleus of atoms atoms were held together by gravity like planetary systems.  Fortunately I think we did manage to get a message back to the teacher.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #62 on: 06/01/2009 19:49:34 »
You base this on a bulb?

This is not about my knowledge on the workings of a bulb. Check my more recent posts that are short lesson installations. If you find error with me, i will admit a mistake, but i will not be a ''victim'' as you put it to shallow attacks on my teaching method, never mind its truthfullness. If i was teaching people how a bulb worked, i would understand your analogy, but i am not teaching that.

 

Offline Soul Surfer

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« Reply #63 on: 06/01/2009 20:03:01 »
can you please explain to me what you mean by the statement

"Take a dice. A dice has about 10^80 grams of energy!"

 
 

Offline syhprum

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« Reply #64 on: 06/01/2009 20:37:22 »
Soulsurfer

When I was at school in 1941 not only were we taught that Electron orbited the nucleus like little planets but that the nucleus consisted of Protons and Electrons.
Perhaps Neutrons were a military secret in 1941 !
« Last Edit: 06/01/2009 20:40:34 by syhprum »
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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« Reply #65 on: 06/01/2009 20:48:42 »
Early  theories of atomic structure did not recognise neutrons.  These were first described as separate particles by Chadwick I think (must look this up)

The way it was described was like this.   It was known that protons congregated in the centre of the atom but it was not known how they bound together.  It was known that a certain number of electrons were in shells around the nucleus and these defined the chemical properties of the atom.  The atomic weight of elements showed that there was an excess of heavy particles over the atomic number in higher atomic weight nuclei so it was assumed that they were protons and electrons bound together in a different way to hold the nucleus together against the powerful repulsive forces of the positively charged protons.  these electrons were described for a few years as nuclear electrons.

OK this was eventually shown to be wrong but it was the best Idea that they had at the time.


Neutrons were first and observed made by bombarding a beryllium target with alpha particles(helium nuclei)
 from polonium  first observed by the curies but researched and explained by chadwick

"Chadwick immediately repeated the experiments at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, England. He not only bombarded the hydrogen atoms in paraffin with the beryllium emissions, but also used helium, nitrogen, and other elements as targets. By comparing the energies of recoiling charged particles from different targets, he proved that the beryllium emissions contained a neutral component with a mass approximately equal to that of the proton. He called it the neutron in a paper published in the February 17, 1932, issue of Nature. In 1935, Sir James Chadwick received the Nobel Prize in physics for this work"

extract from http://www.chemcases.com/nuclear/nc-01.htm

So your teachers were about ten years behind  (about typical I would think)  In the later forties and early 50s when I was at junior school I read about nuclear structure involving neutrons and had diagrams of a simple two sub critical mass fission bomb and a nuclear reactor in books I could read from the library.
« Last Edit: 06/01/2009 21:05:41 by Soul Surfer »
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #66 on: 06/01/2009 21:36:00 »
can you please explain to me what you mean by the statement

"Take a dice. A dice has about 10^80 grams of energy!"

 

What don't you understand about it?
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #67 on: 06/01/2009 22:03:06 »
When I was a lecturer I listened to all criticisms of my teaching methods. I changed my teaching style a couple of times as a result and when my first batch of students took their degrees most of them thanked me. Incidentally, they got a very high pass rate with most getting a 2.2 or better.

If someone is not prepared to listen to criticism it means they think they are perfect at what they do. I don't believe anyone is.
 

Offline Bikerman

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« Reply #68 on: 06/01/2009 22:34:47 »
Doc is correct. I've been a lecturer and teacher for many years. If you can't take criticism of your teaching method then don't teach...it is really as simple as that.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #69 on: 06/01/2009 22:56:51 »
I simply won't answer the criticism. Hopefully people are wise enough to decide opinions of their own without anyones influence.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #70 on: 06/01/2009 22:58:40 »
Does that mean you're not leaving?  :) ???
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #71 on: 06/01/2009 23:05:26 »
Someone asked very nicely, so i said i would.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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« Reply #72 on: 07/01/2009 00:35:57 »
"Take a dice. A dice has about 10^80 grams of energy!"


Everything is wrong with it! the statement is completely obscure and meanigless in scientific terms

Firstly energy is not measured in grams

secondly 10^80 is a very big number indeed

Finally precisely how are they related to a dice  (strictly the term for one is a die dice is a plural) but how big and heavy is it? it is not something that has a standard size,

As you claim to have written this statement you must be able to explain it in rather more extended and unambiguous terms.
« Last Edit: 07/01/2009 00:42:12 by Soul Surfer »
 

Offline Madidus_Scientia

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« Reply #73 on: 07/01/2009 06:15:28 »
Quote
secondly 10^80 is a very big number indeed

Yeah even if he meant joules not grams its still wrong, if you estimate a die to be about 8 grams it would have 7.19 * 10^14 joules of energy
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #74 on: 07/01/2009 08:49:53 »
Now that's painful
Quote

I've made a Korea out of remembering things  ;D
 

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« Reply #74 on: 07/01/2009 08:49:53 »

 

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