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Author Topic: Do the people at the back of Tug Of Wars actually do anything?  (Read 6245 times)

Offline Chemistry4me

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Now I'll be the first to admit, I'm no Tug Of War expert, and most likely never will be  :) But let's imagine that there is a 20 per-side Tug Of War going on, do the nineteenth and twentieth men actually do anything to contribute to the pulling? Where does the primary power come from? Is there an exact spot where this can be pin pointed?  :-\ If the nineteenth man was more powerful than the twentieth man, then would it not mean that the twentieth man is basically pulling on the length of rope between him and the ninteenth man? When I say "actually do anything" I don't  mean to say that they are doing nothing but would he be doing more or less work than say, the first puller or the second ??? ???

 


 

Offline LeeE

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You don't need to go up to twenty people; it'll happen with just two.  In practice, each person will be pulling a slightly different amount but overall their effort is added.  It's interesting to compare this scenario with that of a train locomotive pulling a rake of wagons;  in this case, the locomotive pulls the first wagon, which pulls the second...
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Do you think the first person does more pulling or the second?
 

Offline Madidus_Scientia

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It doesn't matter if the first person is more powerful than the next, the first person applies all the force they can, and no matter how feeble the second persons force is it will add to the net force

Two people of equal strength should apply the same force to the rope
 

lyner

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If they can all pull with, say, 1000N of force, the end section of rope will have a tension of 1000N. The section in front of the end two men will have a section of 2000N, the next section 3000N etc. The bit between the two teams will have the total in forces from each teams. If they are equal forces then they will not be going either way.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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The village where I used to live had a tug o' war team (8 men). I was told that the heaviest man goes at the back to act as a kind of anchor. The first in the line was the captain and he set the rhythm for the team, much as the lead oarsman does in a coxless rowing event. I don't know how the remaining order was arranged.
 

Offline Karsten

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Tug of war used to be an Olympic sport. I am sure there is a lot of science to this. I wish it would come back, but maybe it was just too boring and long to watch.

The heaviest people go in the back also because the lighter people need friction with the ground to do good pulling. The "anchors" in the back help to get your strength on the ground. I recommend also alternating sides for the pullers so each has enough room to move. An important part of winning is also to be still strong when the other team has lost strength. Pullers in the front can lock the motion towards the other team if they can wedge themselves between rope and ground. It requires a "heavy" rope (one that does not move up due to heavy pulling from behind) and sticky shoes. Lock your knees, hold on tight and hope the other team is not stronger than your knees.  ;D You pull to win when the other team is tired out.

And don't forget to remove jewelry from fingers. We had a student once who almost lost his finger when the rope snapped and his ring got caught. I was not there, but so goes the story.

Karsten
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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But once a team gets even a little bit of momentum, its quite hard to hold back isn't it? Are they allowed to get a big sumo wrestler at the back and just tie the rope around him and let him sit down?
 

Offline Karsten

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Yes, momentum of the other team is hard to break.  It seems that the other team at that moment has found its rhythm and your team is out of sync, basically just stumbling without coordination. We (the faculty at my school) won one match against the seniors of our school once even though they had momentum for a while. We almost lost. We won that year, I believe, because they lost their rhythm even though they were winning and we found back ours. It was a good tug-of-war.

The sumo wrestler probably would only be allowed if the rest of the team is lighter built than average. I believe there used to be a maximum team weight. I am not sure though. That is what I would consider fair right now.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Do you do it on grass or concrete or what surface. Surely you can just dig your feet into the grass and try and slow down the momentum, might be a bit harder on concrete though [:0]
 

Offline turnipsock

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Its usually on grass, or at least it was at all the highland games I was at.



The digging in of feet is a part of the game and teams will sit for ages just taking the strain, waiting for the moment to strike. The big policemen from Glasgow were always very good at this.

I used to ride a bike at the highland games.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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I used to ride a bike at the highland games.
??? ??? ???
You mean like a unicycle or something?
 

Offline Karsten

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We usually pull on a gymnasium floor. You need good ankle supporting shoes. The room is not very long and the tug-of-war kind of turns into a self-regulating, balanced procedure. Once one team begins to win and pulls the other team forward the people at the back bump into the walls at either end of the room and cannot participate any longer. As a result the other team gains strength and pulls back, gains momentum, and can only be stopped when their team loses members due to touching the wall. Until they figure out that they need to pull closer to the middle of the rope.

Thanks for sending the picture. It looks like my thoughts about staggering the people to create more room are not sound. Maybe it is more important to find team members that are stronger with all the same foot forward.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Do you know there is a Tug Of War Federation  :o :o :o
You'll find it here
 

Offline Karsten

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They require that the weighing in of the team members occurs in non-transparent shorts and shirts. Funny they thought of that.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Some of those blokes must be contracting their muscles for a very long period of time when they're pulling.
 

Offline turnipsock

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I think that is part of the sport.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Do you think their genitals shrink with all that contracting?
 

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