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Author Topic: Does gravity vary with temperature?  (Read 33941 times)

Offline Vern

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Does gravity vary with temperature?
« Reply #50 on: 03/02/2009 12:55:59 »
Quote from: yor_on
Then you shouldn't be able to have the former state beside it.
Still, if Planck size is a correct description of where our 'spacetime' loses its coherence?
Then that is where the 'backdoor' might be situated?
It is the transitions from energy to matter that brought me to suspect that we didn't really have it just right yet. I didn't like the magical idea that energy just goes away and matter appears in its place.

But if you want to visualize the transition that way, what better place for a back door than a Planck length :)
 

Offline Vern

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Does gravity vary with temperature?
« Reply #51 on: 03/02/2009 13:07:22 »
Ok, if you use Feodora you have a plugin from Redhat somewhere on those pages:)

But be sure to check for 'dependencies' when you install it.
The 'installers' should make it an easy transition, but it may take some time.
http://www.fedorafaq.org/

Reading 'between the lines' I get the feeling that you want the universe to be a more ordered place than what it seems for the moment:)
Don't we all::))

You are very resourceful yor_on. Thanks for the link. I knew the site was there but didn't know it provided plugins.
 

Offline Vern

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Does gravity vary with temperature?
« Reply #52 on: 03/02/2009 13:52:01 »
yor_on; I viewed the link you provided about the Black Hole; it was very interesting. I noticed that the galaxy with the Black Hole at the center had jets of material probably ions jetting out form the center. Where can the stuff come from if not from the Black Hole. Maybe galaxies just coagulate stuff from their disks and squirt it out in the flat wise plane.

If so we could visualize a super massive object in place of a Black Hole.
 

Offline Maze

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Does gravity vary with temperature?
« Reply #53 on: 10/03/2009 10:26:36 »
Would it not be possible to do an experiment to test this relationship.
For example have a large a mass as possible and measure its gravity at different temperatures.
 

Offline Vern

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Does gravity vary with temperature?
« Reply #54 on: 10/03/2009 15:36:13 »
I don't think there's a question about whether mass increases with temperature; we all pretty much know that mass must increase because of the increased energy trapped in the local massive area. Gravity has a special relationship with mass, so it must also increase.
« Last Edit: 10/03/2009 15:39:45 by Vern »
 

Offline Maze

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Does gravity vary with temperature?
« Reply #55 on: 11/03/2009 10:52:46 »
Yes but we don't know precisely what causes gravity so there is always room for surprises. I suppose I really am saying that I would like to see an experiment to confirm such a relationaship.

 

Offline Vern

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Does gravity vary with temperature?
« Reply #56 on: 11/03/2009 10:59:40 »
The problem with a direct experiment is that the mass-equivalence ratio between mass and energy gives a very small mass increase; much too small to measure with any device we now have. 
 

Offline GManIM

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Does gravity vary with temperature?
« Reply #57 on: 27/05/2010 18:53:03 »
An interesting question. 

This question was first posed by "mainstream science" about one hundred years ago. 

The plain vanilla interpretation of mass-energy equivalence implies through EFE that the curvature of space-time is related to the energy content of matter; and as the energy content of matter is said to increase with temperature, it was surmised that an increase of temperature might increase the curvature of space time and the gravitational mass of matter. 

Experiments have yielded variable results but strangely enough, such non-zero results as exist suggest that gravitational mass actually decreases with increased temperature, which rather supports A Davies' assertion. 

It appears that the contribution of temperature to gravitation is very small and negative

cf newbielink:http://www.novafizika.com/The%20gravitational%20force%20temperature%20dependence.pdf [nonactive]
 

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Does gravity vary with temperature?
« Reply #57 on: 27/05/2010 18:53:03 »

 

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