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Author Topic: Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?  (Read 4291 times)

Offline AllenG

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« on: 21/01/2009 02:18:10 »
I was just watching a Nature broadcast about Komodo Dragons.
More bacteria has been identified in the human mouth than in that of the Dragons'.
Since it is thought that the Komodo Dragon uses its oral flora as a hunting tool, being that we have very little in the way of tooth and claw, is it possible that a human's filthy mouth developed as a defense mechanism?

Does anyone know how our oral flora stacks up against what is growing in a simian's mouth.
How about homo sapiens v. canine or other mammals in general?


 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #1 on: 21/01/2009 02:20:29 »
is it possible that a human's filthy mouth developed as a defense mechanism?
Against what?
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #2 on: 21/01/2009 02:26:20 »
Have a look at this interview
 

Offline AllenG

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #3 on: 21/01/2009 03:22:01 »
is it possible that a human's filthy mouth developed as a defense mechanism?
Against what?

That which preyed on humans before we figured out how to make pointy sticks and guns.

I was thinking that even if it would not help the individual from becoming prey, maybe a festering bite wound would discourage a predator from returning for other humans.
« Last Edit: 21/01/2009 03:27:13 by AllenG »
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #4 on: 21/01/2009 05:03:15 »
If you mean defense mechanism as in scaring somebody/something off with your pongy breath then it certainly is possible  :D:D:D
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #5 on: 21/01/2009 05:09:34 »
I was thinking that even if it would not help the individual from becoming prey, maybe a festering bite wound would discourage a predator from returning for other humans.
On a more serious note, injecting animals with a dose of bacteria probably isn't out of the question, but first the teeth will have to puncture the skin first before any damage can be done.
 

Offline AllenG

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #6 on: 21/01/2009 07:07:31 »
If you mean defense mechanism as in scaring somebody/something off with your pongy breath then it certainly is possible  :D:D:D
Then the anchovies and garlic defiantly stay on the pizza.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #7 on: 21/01/2009 07:11:55 »
Did you have pizza for dinner or something?   :D :D
 

Offline AllenG

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #8 on: 21/01/2009 07:37:10 »
I was thinking that even if it would not help the individual from becoming prey, maybe a festering bite wound would discourage a predator from returning for other humans.
On a more serious note, injecting animals with a dose of bacteria probably isn't out of the question, but first the teeth will have to puncture the skin first before any damage can be done.
Well, the show led me to believe that the human mouth was host to a larger than normal amount of microbes, several if unchecked could be rather unpleasent.
Saying the show was not being dramatic, and we do have significantly larger cornucopia of oral flora than the average mammal, then what advantage is it to us to have developed it?  It seemed reasonable to me  that it may be in a way similar to the Komodo, but rather than an in an offense manner, a defensive one. Fortunately, for the most part, humans don't slobber as profusely as a Komodo--I'm looking at you JimBob.  ;)

« Last Edit: 21/01/2009 07:40:10 by AllenG »
 

Offline Madidus_Scientia

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #9 on: 21/01/2009 09:07:11 »
The Komodo may culture a specific type/s of bacteria that humans do not.
 

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Is Human Oral Flora a Defense Mechanism?
« Reply #9 on: 21/01/2009 09:07:11 »

 

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