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Author Topic: Can one unify gravity and temperature?  (Read 11457 times)

Offline A Davis

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Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« on: 27/01/2009 15:33:14 »
The following equation can be used to unify Newtons gravity equation with Maxwells equation. The equation was determined numerically.


            g = α2μoμr


Alpha is the Fine Structure constant and μo the permeability of free space, μr = 1.
The fine structure constant has four main parts, the most significant being the Intrinsic Spin of the Electron S.


                   α = π S/8                ( appoximately)


From the Curie Weiss law.


         g = π2 S2(1 + C/(T-θf))/64


Testing this equation on the Sun at it's current temperatue of above 1 million deg μr = 1, and assuming it has an iron core then at the Curie temperature of 1090degK μr = 5000, as the Sun cools it's spin reduces, so at the Curie temperature it's spin should be 0.9 revolutions per day (11years/5000). It's not possible, the increased gravitational force causes the Sun to implode and produce a smaller solution rotating faster.
There is a second example and that is Binary Star Systems when a star cools down it's gravitational force increases, but it can't increase it's spin, nature has a solution the cooling star must find a companion and it's increased gravitational force helps it to do so. This is why Binary Star Systems are so common, the rotational spin of the pair brings gravity back to it's normal value. The above equation predicts
that the square of the period of rotation is proportional to the temperature of the coldest star. (The spin value is universal)


A.Davis. B.Sc. 27.01.2009

Mod edit - formatted the subject as a question - please do this to help keep the forum tidy and easy to navigate - thanks!

Mod edit - formatted the subject as a question again - please do not undo this change
« Last Edit: 14/02/2009 17:01:03 by BenV »


 

Offline Vern

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #1 on: 27/01/2009 16:38:49 »
Do you not need permittivity or is that the 1.
 

Offline A Davis

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #2 on: 28/01/2009 00:24:22 »
Permittivity is in Maxwells equation for the velocity of light, if one rearranges the equation I have shown and puts it in Maxwells equation then the gravitational constant is in the equation, Unification.
 

Offline Vern

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #3 on: 28/01/2009 12:22:14 »
Permittivity is in Maxwells equation for the velocity of light, if one rearranges the equation I have shown and puts it in Maxwells equation then the gravitational constant is in the equation, Unification.
The way I understood Maxwell is that permeability was the property of a material that allowed a magnetic field and permittivity was the property that allowed the electric field. Maybe "allowed" is not the right word.

I'm not all that swift when it comes to manipulating maths; but it just seemed that permittivity might be unaccounted for in your equation since it is in the Maxwell equations. If you could show your derivation I might could follow it even though I can't do it from scratch.
« Last Edit: 28/01/2009 16:12:47 by Vern »
 

Offline A Davis

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #4 on: 28/01/2009 23:46:40 »
The equation I have shown is all magnetic Vern there is no electric field or charge in the equation. If one rearranges it to  give.
μo = g/(α2μr) and substitute it into c2=1/(ε0.μ0) Maxwell then one gets

c2 = α2.μr /(εo.g)
There is no derivation it was determined numerically it's a new equation to Science, Science has to test it numerically and then dimensionally when they have a result they have to form a conclusion, is it correct or not!
« Last Edit: 28/01/2009 23:48:33 by A Davis »
 

Offline Vern

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #5 on: 28/01/2009 23:57:43 »
The equation I have shown is all magnetic Vern there is no electric field or charge in the equation. If one rearranges it to  give.
μo = g/(α2μr) and substitute it into c2=1/(ε0.μ0) Maxwell then one gets

c2 = α2.μr /(εo.g)
There is no derivation it was determined numerically it's a new equation to Science, Science has to test it numerically and then dimensionally when they have a result they have to form a conclusion, is it correct or not!
Well; good luck:) It is a little bit over my head to put it to the test. Maybe someone will offer some insight.
 

Offline LeeE

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #6 on: 30/01/2009 12:31:04 »
The following equation can be used to unify Newtons gravity equation with Maxwells equation. The equation was determined numerically.

            g = α2μoμr

Alpha is the Fine Structure constant and μo the permeability of free space, μr = 1.

A.Davis. B.Sc. 27.01.2009

This doesn't seem to work for me.  What values and units were you working in?

If I use the following values:
α = 7.29735257x10-3
μ0 = 1.2566x10-6

then:
α2 = 5.325135x10-5

and:
5.325135x10-5 x 1.2566x10-6 = 6.69156464x10-11

but:
g = 6.67428x10-11


The values for the constants were obtained from wikipedia, with the value for α being the corrected value.  However, even the older uncorrected value doesn't give g.
 

Offline A Davis

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #7 on: 30/01/2009 23:19:32 »
Nice to see somebody doing some maths, your values agree with mine there is a small error. Life isn't simple in Science there are always errors which lead to corrections, if you want a correction look at the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Electron square the correction value and divide it into the value you have calculated from my equation, there's no point in going any further the measured value isn't accurate enough. You have to do the dimensional analysis yourself and come to a conclusion, it's not easy.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #8 on: 01/02/2009 10:00:00 »
"There is no derivation it was determined numerically it's a new equation to Science, Science has to test it numerically and then dimensionally when they have a result they have to form a conclusion, is it correct or not!"
And Science has tested it, and it's not correct because it gives the wrong answer for G.
A small error as you call it is bigger than the errors on the numbers you are working with. The least acurately known is G which is known to 6 significant figures so the agreement should be that good. It isn't, it's only good to 2 figures and that's far to imprecise to be experimental error.
You have just come up with an amusing (near) coincidence.

Heres' a joke based on a much better coincidence (5 sig fig).
http://xkcd.com/217/
 

Offline A Davis

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #9 on: 08/02/2009 21:32:43 »
The error between the two values is 1.00258973
Squaring the anomalous magnetic moment gives 1.00232054 and removing it gives, error 1.00026856
Taking the squareroot of the reduced mass correction gives 1.0002722 and removing it gives, error 1.000004.

The way to attack the theory is to prove that the predicted square law in the Binary Star System, is wrong.
If the period of rotation squared is not proportional to the temperature of the coldest star, then I will
concede defeat.
 

Offline LeeE

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #10 on: 08/02/2009 21:44:52 »
Hang on a minute - you've changed the title of the thread to relate to temperatures now, which had nothing to do with your original postings.  What are you up to?
 

Offline A Davis

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #11 on: 09/02/2009 23:19:50 »
Unifying both of them. Put the new equations at the beginning. More to come.
 

Offline A Davis

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #12 on: 11/02/2009 00:01:24 »
The next question is what happens when both the stars in a binary star system reach their curie temperatures. First they will implode and then they will explode.

The result is the same as eta carinae.
« Last Edit: 11/02/2009 00:05:29 by A Davis »
 

lyner

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #13 on: 11/02/2009 10:23:58 »
A Davis
Quote
There is a second example and that is Binary Star Systems when a star cools down it's gravitational force increases, but it can't increase it's spin, nature has a solution the cooling star must find a companion and it's increased gravitational force helps it to do so. This is why Binary Star Systems are so common, the rotational spin of the pair brings gravity back to it's normal value.

So, we've got this star which  cools down to this limit of yours. It's been doing an essentially Newtonian thing and following its lonely (minimum energy) path through the  Galaxy. Suddenly it breaks out of this behaviour - getting incredible amounts of ENERGY (from where, exactly?) and locates a suitable chum to visit. They then set up home together in a mutual orbit of low eccentricity - involving a load more energy to make the  change in trajerctory. This corresponds to a major cosmological event. Why haven't any stars  observed doing this (you claim it is a common phenomenon)?

Should I believe your bit of numerology or the evidence, or rather, non-evidence produced from Astronomy?
 

Offline A Davis

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #14 on: 11/02/2009 23:51:26 »
January edition Astronomy now page 68, quote Estimates suggest that two-thirds of stars in our local
neighbourhood are doubles. Binary star systems are a big part of nature. One can also get triplets and other multiples of stars. I don't understand where you are getting all this energy from, most of it is locked up inside the Stars.
 

Offline Vern

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #15 on: 12/02/2009 18:27:45 »
Hi A. Davis; do you have any candidates for stars that might become Sol's companion?
 

Offline BenV

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #16 on: 12/02/2009 18:48:25 »
A. Davis - The subject line of this thread was changed, by me, to be a question, as this is in line with forum policy.   I put a note in your post to explain as much, and now I find that you have altered it back without explanation.

Kindly edit your original post so that the subject line is a question.  I would also appreciate it in future if you did not revert changes that moderators have made.
 

Offline A Davis

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #17 on: 13/02/2009 22:52:56 »
I don't understand your reasoning. There's a lot of new Science to do , I am in no position to do it, only work on the Maths, to me it's a challenge to young graduate science students to take it forwards could get a P.hd. in the following areas.
1. The half integer solution is interesting.
2. Put the equation into precession theory, very interesting.
3. The maximum value for c is in the maths.
4. Relativistic change in spin.
5. Relativistic change in charge.
6. Our Sun has a companion, worth looking at.
I will continue doing calculations, if I come up with something new I'll post it.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #18 on: 14/02/2009 16:57:12 »
I think this says it all.
"There's a lot of new Science to do , I am in no position to do it,"
 

lyner

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Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #19 on: 14/02/2009 23:47:58 »
January edition Astronomy now page 68, quote Estimates suggest that two-thirds of stars in our local
neighbourhood are doubles. Binary star systems are a big part of nature. One can also get triplets and other multiples of stars. I don't understand where you are getting all this energy from, most of it is locked up inside the Stars.
I have no problem with the statistics - just your explanation  of them.
What proof do you have that there is any causal relationship?
 

Offline A Davis

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Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #20 on: 17/02/2009 23:27:31 »
To Bored chemist, I am not in a position to do experiments, it would require funding. My pension wouldn't cover it. To SC none, do you have a better explanation. Will post possible Pulsar theory tomorrow.
 

lyner

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Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #21 on: 18/02/2009 11:31:06 »
To Bored chemist, I am not in a position to do experiments, it would require funding. My pension wouldn't cover it. To SC none, do you have a better explanation. Will post possible Pulsar theory tomorrow.
My "better explanation" is the conventional one which is, at least backed up by observations and has some logical consistency. Have you actually spotted any major flaws in it?
From the very start of this thread - its title,even - you have used scientific inconsistency. If we can't use dimensional analysis then the whole of our present Science is very shaky. If you want to be as revolutionary as that, then you can't really quote any of the formulae from established Science - which were based upon the idea of dimensional consistency. You are on your own from the very start. You have leaped in, half way through and cherry picked the bits that fit your fancy. As I said before, it's no more than numerology.
 

Offline A Davis

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Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #22 on: 20/02/2009 00:11:02 »
I agree, I am on my own. Newtons Laws do describe planetary motion, if the universe is made from elecromagnetic radiation then what electrical unit replaces mass. There are a number of electrical problems with our solar system, the suns magnetic field should decrease as the cube of the distance from the sun it doesn't. Why. Mars has a very small magnetic field. Why. I am trying to prove that the numbers work first, if they didn't I would put the theory into the dustbin.
 

lyner

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Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #23 on: 20/02/2009 09:57:38 »
Quote
the suns magnetic field should decrease as the cube of the distance from the sun
why?
 

Offline A Davis

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Can one unify gravity and temperature?
« Reply #24 on: 23/02/2009 23:57:47 »
I can't answer the question fully, not done enough Maths on the problem. It's interesting to note that Keplers equation can be seen in Stratton i.e. r 3/2
 

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