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Author Topic: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?  (Read 13200 times)

Offline neilep

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Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« on: 24/04/2005 03:00:37 »
It's Sunday 3am and I need to know why Bread goes off quicker in the Fridge ?

I also need to know why on Earth am I am asking this question at 3am on on a Sunday Morning ?

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Offline DrPhil

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #1 on: 24/04/2005 20:44:23 »
My dear old mom always told me that refrigeration speeds up the crystallization of starch (I don't know if crystallization is the right word.) It turns out that temps around 40F is where the starch changes the quickest. So you should store bread in the freezer or at room temperature, but not in the fridge.
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #2 on: 24/04/2005 22:33:17 »
Thanks Phil, I've often wondered why bread is one of those few foods that ' cooling ' is deleterious to it's condition.

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Offline Santi2c

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #3 on: 24/04/2005 23:24:48 »
I've actually found the opposite to be true with bread.  Less mold, and more moist if you keep it in a bag in the fridge..
 

Offline DrPhil

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #4 on: 24/04/2005 23:37:39 »
We need to hear from a bread expert. I'm only repeating what I was told. My dear old mom wasn't a scientist (unless you can call someone with a Masters in Library Science a scientist) and she wasn't even a very good cook, but she had no reason to lie to me. :D
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #5 on: 25/04/2005 00:06:36 »
Next door to my store is a very ' well to do ' sandwich place that make all their own bread, and they have a notice on their window that putting bread in the fridge is a big no no......unless a passing ' bread in a fridge' expert answers, I will ask them next time I have lunch there.....additionally, I have noticed this myself when placing a loaf in the fridge, it dries quickly and goes off even sooner.

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Offline realmswalker

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #6 on: 25/04/2005 06:31:22 »
this would be an easy expirement to test this.
Bake yourself a load of bread.(DO NOT EAT IT)
Cut into 2 peices
put one on the counter, one in the fridge
Observe the results over time.
 

Offline Les the Scientist

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #7 on: 27/04/2005 20:55:34 »
I would have guessed it was to do with the moisture levels in a fridge.  The bacteria will grow much quicker if it's got some water to live off and fridges are quite damp places.  However leaving your bread on the counter, where it's relatively dry, you'll see it go stale but not mouldy for quite a while.

Now you should try soaking the bread with water then putting it in the airing cupboard for a fortnight.  See how quick the mould grows then !  [8D]
 

Offline PhirePhly

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #8 on: 28/04/2005 05:13:58 »
quote:
Originally posted by DrPhil

We need to hear from a bread expert. I'm only repeating what I was told. My dear old mom wasn't a scientist (unless you can call someone with a Masters in Library Science a scientist) and she wasn't even a very good cook, but she had no reason to lie to me. :D



Don't know about "expert" but I've baked my own bread (no bread machine, actual mix-knead-rise-punch-shape-rise-bake baking) for better than 15 years and I used to manage a bakery in Dallas that had about 65% of the bun and pastry market in the hotel restuarants.

I can tell you this.  The fridge is not a friend of bread.

Factors that make bread go stale quickly are sometimes related to yeast that hasn't been killed in the cooking process.

I find that if I freeze bread immediately after baking it, when it is later thawed (in a microwave, usually), it will keep wrapped, but otherwise un-messed-with on the countertop for up to a week without noticable hardening, mold or drying.

Keeping air away from the "cut" end of the bread is important.

Keeping the surface of the bread dry is important.

I usually manage that by putting the bread in a large freezer bag and tying it shut with one of those little wire thingys.

If you're interested, my best bread recipe follows:

5 ĺ cups of bread flour
1 cup wheat flour
4 tablespoons sugar
1 Ĺ teaspoons salt
4 teaspoons yeast

Mix all dry ingredients (above)

Separately put 1 cup water with 1 tablespoon butter in a glass bowl and heat in microwave until butter is melted.

Add to the water/butter another 1 ľ cup of water (this cools it down enough so as not to kill the yeast in the next step).

Add liquids to dry ingredients and mix until a ball.

Knead ball sufficiently (youíll have to learn how much this is by trial and error, but lots - when you ball it up tight, it ought to feel like a young woman's bottom (well, at least it should feel like the bottom of a young woman whose bottom you'd want to feel - if it's more like that young woman's mum's bottom, you have more work to do)).

Place in greased or oiled glass bowl (no metal!) and cover loosely with plastic wrap (keeps moisture in).  Put in dark, warm place until risen to twice its starting bulk (a dishwasher after you've done a load is perfect, but don't forget it's in there and start a new cycle or you'll have something awful that isn't quite bread).

Punch down dough and split in two, roll tightly (or otherwise compress) and place in two greased bread pans for second rise (again, about twice its starting bulk).

Bake at approximately 350 degrees (f) for approximately 40 minutes (very approximate as your ovenís temperature regulation may not match ours and varying this is how you vary the crust of the bread anyway, so you may like it a little different that we do).

A note about salt and sugar Ė these are not there for taste Ė sugar feeds the yeast and should all be converted by the end of the cooking cycle and the saltís there to slow down the rise.  If you find that you have too aggressive a second rise (large bubbles in your bread), increase the amount of salt a very small bit and try again.  If you find you canít get rid of the bubbles and still get a second rise, back off on the salt a bit and increase the sugar a tiny bit.  Tweaking these two ingredients is how the heaviness and airiness of bread is adjusted.


Thanks,
 
L. Lisov
 

Offline Tronix

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #9 on: 29/04/2005 02:15:16 »
yeah. Wheni put stuf in the fridge, paticularly in tupperware, water is condensed on in the box. And bread, being porous, is pretty absorbent. so its like each slice of bread is a mini swamp cooler, and if anything bacteria loooove dat bayou enviroment, chilly and damp. And, with all the unkilled yeast, bacteria on your hands, in the air, and with all those tiny hoels in the bread, you got air, water, food, and temperture. a little bacterial bug party.

Same reason why coleslaw get bad quick, except the bacteria that gorw in the mayo need it warmer.

funny though, im got compost in a sealed jar on a window sill, along with what and a bunch of miracle whip on top, and it hasnt changed color anything. its really runny and sometimes bubbles (which i think is the gas from the soup "cooking" beneath it), but other than that it looks halfway edible. and on the subject of bread, i stuffed a piece of bread in a jar with dirt and a bit of water (not on the bread), selaed it and kept it on a window sill. didnt even start to get moldy until 28 days later. Its amazing the mold and bacteria in the air, i would guess.

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Offline neilep

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #10 on: 29/04/2005 08:28:42 »
quote:
Originally posted by realmswalker

this would be an easy expirement to test this.
Bake yourself a load of bread.(DO NOT EAT IT)
Cut into 2 peices
put one on the counter, one in the fridge
Observe the results over time.



Well, as a firm believer in empirical study I took two pieces of bread and placed one in the fridge and left one out. As expected after a couple of days the fridged bread went off much sooner. QED

Men are the same as women.... just inside out !!
 

Offline DrPhil

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #11 on: 29/04/2005 11:50:27 »
After conducting a comprehensive and exhaustive literature search I found this at HGTV.com, the definitive source for bread enthusiasts. ;)

The Golden Rules
1. Never keep bread in the fridge. It encourages the bread to go stale faster. The sugars contained within the bread will crystallize in the refrigerator and cause the bread to dry out.
2. Keep the crust as the top slice. This helps to retain softness and moistness in the rest of the loaf.
3. Keep the wrapper air tight. This helps to prevent your bread drying out.
4. Use a cool, dry, dark place. Bread bins are ideal.
5. Freeze it. For longer storage, bread can be frozen for up to three months.
 

Offline daveshorts

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #12 on: 29/04/2005 16:39:56 »
Oh yes you are right the fridge is very dry ( as all the water in the air will consense out at the cooling elements). Which may mean that the bread dries out faster.
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #13 on: 29/04/2005 22:55:40 »
Thank you Phil, thank you Dave........I prefer toast anyway.:)

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Re: Why Does Bread Go Off Quicker In The Fridge ?
« Reply #13 on: 29/04/2005 22:55:40 »

 

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