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Author Topic: What are you Hungry for?  (Read 15454 times)

Offline Karen W.

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What are you Hungry for?
« on: 30/01/2009 07:42:13 »
I am hungry for a prime rib stuffed with garlic .. steamed broccoli a baked potato and some spinach and baby green salad!
I am also hungry for a good quick read and a nice conversation with fun giggles and happy thoughts!..Maybe a nice cup of after dinner cappuccino or hot cocoa!

Maybe late night desert...Not of the food variety! LOL..:)


 

Offline Don_1

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What are you Hungry for?
« Reply #1 on: 30/01/2009 07:58:40 »
I'd like a nice big fat juicy steak, cooked blue.
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #2 on: 30/01/2009 08:01:39 »
Well done for me.. and wheres the transporter cause I am coming to din din!
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #3 on: 30/01/2009 10:48:39 »
I'd like a nice big fat juicy steak, cooked blue.


Is that cooked "Blue?"...  What does that mean?
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #4 on: 30/01/2009 10:53:06 »
It means the outside is seared, but the inside is usually cool and barely cooked, as you can see :)
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #5 on: 30/01/2009 10:57:01 »
YUCK....My son says, "Just slap its Butt,Throw it in the hot pan turn, him over, and call it dinner!

Way to raw for me.. I am a well done girl.. but don"t burn it or anything... I want it tender!
 

Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #6 on: 30/01/2009 11:11:09 »
    * Raw - Uncooked. Used in dishes like steak tartare, Carpaccio, Gored gored, tiger meat and Kitfo.
    * Blue rare or very rare - (37.8C/100F core temp) Cooked very quickly; the outside is seared, but the inside is usually cool and barely cooked. The steak will be red on the inside and barely warmed. Sometimes asked for as 'blood rare'. In the United States this is also sometimes referred to as 'Black and Blue' or 'Pittsburgh Rare'.
    * Rare - (48.9C/120F core temp) The outside is gray-brown, and the middle of the steak is red and slightly warm.
    * Medium rare - (52.2C/126F degrees core temp) The steak will have a fully red, warm center. Unless specified otherwise, upscale steakhouses will generally cook to at least this level.
    * Medium - (57.2C/135F degrees core temp) The middle of the steak is hot and red with pink surrounding the center. The outside is gray-brown.
    * Medium well done - (62.8C/145F degrees core temp) The meat is light pink surrounding the center.
    * Well done - (73.9C/165F degrees core temp) The meat is gray-brown throughout and slightly charred.
 

Offline dentstudent

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What are you Hungry for?
« Reply #7 on: 30/01/2009 11:12:25 »
Least favourite steak dish: Tartare. It's like eating raw burger mix. Infact, it is raw burger mix.
 

Offline Make it Lady

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« Reply #8 on: 30/01/2009 18:18:32 »
Cheese and onion chrisps.....always. If not I'll have a chicken sunday lunch.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #9 on: 30/01/2009 21:48:52 »
some breakfast...
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #10 on: 30/01/2009 23:50:40 »
boeuf bourguignon

I am making some now and the smell is driving me mad - it will be tomorrow, however, before it is at it's prime.
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #11 on: 30/01/2009 23:57:32 »
    * Raw - Uncooked. Used in dishes like steak tartare, Carpaccio, Gored gored, tiger meat and Kitfo.
    * Blue rare or very rare - (37.8C/100F core temp) Cooked very quickly; the outside is seared, but the inside is usually cool and barely cooked. The steak will be red on the inside and barely warmed. Sometimes asked for as 'blood rare'. In the United States this is also sometimes referred to as 'Black and Blue' or 'Pittsburgh Rare'.
    * Rare - (48.9C/120F core temp) The outside is gray-brown, and the middle of the steak is red and slightly warm.
    * Medium rare - (52.2C/126F degrees core temp) The steak will have a fully red, warm center. Unless specified otherwise, upscale steakhouses will generally cook to at least this level.
    * Medium - (57.2C/135F degrees core temp) The middle of the steak is hot and red with pink surrounding the center. The outside is gray-brown.
    * Medium well done - (62.8C/145F degrees core temp) The meat is light pink surrounding the center.
    * Well done - (73.9C/165F degrees core temp) The meat is gray-brown throughout and slightly charred.


Thanks Stuart! I like the well done description of the inside but not charred on the outside.. if there is just the slighted tiny pink its ok but prefer none!
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #12 on: 31/01/2009 00:04:56 »
boeuf bourguignon

I am making some now and the smell is driving me mad - it will be tomorrow, however, before it is at it's prime.
boeuf bourguignon

I am making some now and the smell is driving me mad - it will be tomorrow, however, before it is at it's prime.

Do you have a recipe?
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #13 on: 31/01/2009 00:27:01 »
This is a rather easy recipe. I use any cheap red wine, and I leave out a lot of the steps, such as removing the Garni, blanching the onions - anything that will cut down the work. It is more a stew than the traditional dish but it has the same taste. The French tend to overdo directions and complicate things waaaay too much.

Boeuf bourguignon

Active time: 1 1/4 hr Start to finish: 4 1/4 hr

Servings: Makes 8 servings.
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Ingredients
1/4 lb thick-sliced bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces
3 lb boneless beef chuck, cut into 2-inch pieces
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup brandy
1 (4-inch) piece of celery
4 fresh parsley stems (no leaves)
4 fresh thyme sprigs
2 bay leaves (not California)
2 cloves
2 onions, finely chopped
3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 carrots, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 (750-ml) bottle dry red wine (preferably Burgundy or Côtes du Rhône)
1 lb small (1 1/2-inch) boiling onions or pearl onions
1 lb mushrooms, quartered if large

Accompaniment: peeled boiled potatoes tossed with butter and parsley

Special equipment: kitchen string
Preparation
Cook bacon in boiling salted water 3 minutes, then drain.

Pat beef dry and season with salt and pepper. Divide flour and beef between 2 (1-quart) sealable plastic bags, seal, then shake to coat meat.

Heat 1‚ tablespoons oil and 1 1/2 tablespoons butter in a wide 6- to 8-quart heavy pot over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then brown beef well on all sides in 2 or 3 batches, without crowding, adding remaining ‚ tablespoon oil as needed. Transfer to a bowl.

Pour off any excess oil from pot, then add brandy to pot. Deglaze by boiling over high heat 1 minute, stirring and scraping up brown bits, then pour over beef.

Tie celery, parsley, thyme, bay leaves, and cloves together with kitchen string to make a bouquet garni (tuck cloves into celery so they don’t fall out).

Heat 1 tablespoon butter in cleaned pot over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then sauté bacon, stirring, 2 minutes. Add chopped onions, garlic, and carrots, then sauté, stirring, until onions are pale golden, about 5 minutes. Add tomato paste and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add wine, meat with juices, and bouquet garni and simmer gently, partially covered, until meat is tender, 3 1/2 to 4 hours.

While meat simmers, blanch boiling onions in boiling salted water 1 minute and drain in a colander. Rinse under cold running water, then peel.

Heat 1 tablespoon butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then saute boiling onions, stirring occasionally, until browned in patches. Season with salt and pepper. Add 2 cups water (1 1/2 cups if using pearl onions), then simmer, partially covered, until onions are tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Boil, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until liquid is reduced to a glaze, 5 to 10 minutes.

Heat remaining tablespoon butter in a large nonstick skillet over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then saute mushrooms, stirring, until golden brown and any liquid the mushrooms give off is evaporated, about 8 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Stir onions and mushrooms into stew and cook 10 minutes. Remove bouquet garni and skim any fat from surface of stew. Season with salt and pepper.

Cooks' note:

Boeuf bourguignon may be made 1 day ahead. Cool, uncovered, then chill, covered (it tastes even better made ahead because it gives the flavors time to develop). If making ahead, it’s easier to remove fat from surface after chilling.
« Last Edit: 31/01/2009 00:31:58 by JimBob »
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #14 on: 31/01/2009 00:44:48 »
This is a rather easy recipe. I use any cheap red wine, and I leave out a lot of the steps, such as removing the Garni, blanching the onions - anything that will cut down the work. It is more a stew than the traditional dish but it has the same taste. The French tend to overdo directions and complicate things waaaay too much.

Boeuf bourguignon

Active time: 1 1/4 hr Start to finish: 4 1/4 hr

Servings: Makes 8 servings.
subscribe to Gourmet
Ingredients
1/4 lb thick-sliced bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces
3 lb boneless beef chuck, cut into 2-inch pieces
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup brandy
1 (4-inch) piece of celery
4 fresh parsley stems (no leaves)
4 fresh thyme sprigs
2 bay leaves (not California)
2 cloves
2 onions, finely chopped
3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 carrots, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 (750-ml) bottle dry red wine (preferably Burgundy or Ctes du Rhne)
1 lb small (1 1/2-inch) boiling onions or pearl onions
1 lb mushrooms, quartered if large

Accompaniment: peeled boiled potatoes tossed with butter and parsley

Special equipment: kitchen string
Preparation
Cook bacon in boiling salted water 3 minutes, then drain.

Pat beef dry and season with salt and pepper. Divide flour and beef between 2 (1-quart) sealable plastic bags, seal, then shake to coat meat.

Heat 1 tablespoons oil and 1 1/2 tablespoons butter in a wide 6- to 8-quart heavy pot over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then brown beef well on all sides in 2 or 3 batches, without crowding, adding remaining tablespoon oil as needed. Transfer to a bowl.

Pour off any excess oil from pot, then add brandy to pot. Deglaze by boiling over high heat 1 minute, stirring and scraping up brown bits, then pour over beef.

Tie celery, parsley, thyme, bay leaves, and cloves together with kitchen string to make a bouquet garni (tuck cloves into celery so they dont fall out).

Heat 1 tablespoon butter in cleaned pot over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then saut bacon, stirring, 2 minutes. Add chopped onions, garlic, and carrots, then saut, stirring, until onions are pale golden, about 5 minutes. Add tomato paste and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add wine, meat with juices, and bouquet garni and simmer gently, partially covered, until meat is tender, 3 1/2 to 4 hours.

While meat simmers, blanch boiling onions in boiling salted water 1 minute and drain in a colander. Rinse under cold running water, then peel.

Heat 1 tablespoon butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then saute boiling onions, stirring occasionally, until browned in patches. Season with salt and pepper. Add 2 cups water (1 1/2 cups if using pearl onions), then simmer, partially covered, until onions are tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Boil, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until liquid is reduced to a glaze, 5 to 10 minutes.

Heat remaining tablespoon butter in a large nonstick skillet over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then saute mushrooms, stirring, until golden brown and any liquid the mushrooms give off is evaporated, about 8 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Stir onions and mushrooms into stew and cook 10 minutes. Remove bouquet garni and skim any fat from surface of stew. Season with salt and pepper.

Cooks' note:

Boeuf bourguignon may be made 1 day ahead. Cool, uncovered, then chill, covered (it tastes even better made ahead because it gives the flavors time to develop). If making ahead, its easier to remove fat from surface after chilling.

Sounds divine JimBob! I will try it it sounds so good and hearty!
 

Offline RD

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« Reply #15 on: 31/01/2009 12:06:29 »
    * Raw - Uncooked. Used in dishes like steak tartare, Carpaccio, Gored gored, tiger meat and Kitfo.

     * Raw - a good vet could get it back on its feet  :)

 

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What are you Hungry for?
« Reply #16 on: 31/01/2009 14:32:56 »
boeuf bourguignon

I am making some now and the smell is driving me mad - it will be tomorrow, however, before it is at it's prime.

That's a very good thing to cook JimBob and as you say so much better the next day. Intrigued about the left-out step, removing the garni. Exactly what are you going to do with the time saved here - all  ;)0.000001 seconds?
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #17 on: 31/01/2009 17:00:44 »
boeuf bourguignon

I am making some now and the smell is driving me mad - it will be tomorrow, however, before it is at it's prime.

That's a very good thing to cook JimBob and as you say so much better the next day. Intrigued about the left-out step, removing the garni. Exactly what are you going to do with the time saved here - all  ;)0.000001 seconds?

Eat the stuff, what else.

And the time saved is not in removing the garni, but in fixing it - finding the string you can't remember where you stored the darn ball of string, holding all of the veggies together while trying to tie them up with your greasy fingers, let alone finding the right sized stuff to hold, etc. (Have you ever tried to tie dried thyme flakes together, let alone the ground thyme most commonly sold here in the US?)
 

 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #18 on: 31/01/2009 23:10:02 »
Some chicken...  :P :P :P
 

Offline Carolyn

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« Reply #19 on: 31/01/2009 23:16:29 »
Hubby is taking me out for surf & turf!  Yum!
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #20 on: 31/01/2009 23:17:42 »
What's that?
 

Offline Make it Lady

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« Reply #21 on: 31/01/2009 23:27:30 »
Although it sounds like a sex in the outdoors experience it is a combination of steak and sea food, usually shell fish especially oysters. 
 

blakestyger

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« Reply #22 on: 31/01/2009 23:39:51 »
Eat the stuff, what else.

And the time saved is not in removing the garni, but in fixing it - finding the string you can't remember where you stored the darn ball of string, holding all of the veggies together while trying to tie them up with your greasy fingers, let alone finding the right sized stuff to hold, etc. (Have you ever tried to tie dried thyme flakes together, let alone the ground thyme most commonly sold here in the US?)

Hmm.. sounds as if you're tying the herbs together with string. What we do is tip them all into a bit of muslin and then tie that; it doesnt matter then if they are dried/flaked. It makes a little round sack about the size of a poodle's nose and can be easily be fished out with a spoon. ;)
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #23 on: 31/01/2009 23:59:27 »
    * Raw - Uncooked. Used in dishes like steak tartare, Carpaccio, Gored gored, tiger meat and Kitfo.

     * Raw - a good vet could get it back on its feet  :)



LOL LOL.... That's too funny!!
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #24 on: 01/02/2009 00:04:50 »
Eat the stuff, what else.

And the time saved is not in removing the garni, but in fixing it - finding the string you can't remember where you stored the darn ball of string, holding all of the veggies together while trying to tie them up with your greasy fingers, let alone finding the right sized stuff to hold, etc. (Have you ever tried to tie dried thyme flakes together, let alone the ground thyme most commonly sold here in the US?)

Hmm.. sounds as if you're tying the herbs together with string. What we do is tip them all into a bit of muslin and then tie that; it doesnt matter then if they are dried/flaked. It makes a little round sack about the size of a poodle's nose and can be easily be fished out with a spoon. ;)

That's the way we have always done it too. Just don"t use brightly colored muslin's or you may find your dinner a bit odd looking when the color runs into dinner! LOL.. I did that once a long time ago with some that was not color fast! .. LOL! My chicken was no had a purple color about its flesh! HEE HEE..
 

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What are you Hungry for?
« Reply #24 on: 01/02/2009 00:04:50 »

 

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