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Author Topic: What vitamins are needed during drug and alcohol withdrawal?  (Read 83042 times)

MDriver1981

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I believe that when an addict is recovering from drugs or alcohol, taking a high dose regiment of B vitamins is essential.  Inositol (B8) is probably the most important of the B compounds in regards to a person's sobriety.  Any thoughts?
« Last Edit: 15/12/2009 23:23:06 by chris »

Chemistry4me

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A daily multi-vitamin is probably a good idea

Chemistry4me

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Vitamin deficiencies, particularly of the B vitamins and vitamin C, may be responsible for much of the lethargy, skin irritation, memory loss and depression experienced by people who are newly recovering from an addiction to alcohol.

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Individuals in recovery can benefit from a healthy diet and a vitamin regimen.* Vitamin B in general, and particularly vitamins B1 (thiamin), B3 (niacin) and B5 (Pantothenic Acid) play a role in turning sugars into energy. Pork is one of the unsurpassed sources of B1, other sources include cereals and nuts. B2 can also be saved in pork and fortified cereals, as well as, salmon and swordfish. Whole grains, milk, eggs, and liver are perhaps the best food sources for Pantothenic Acid. Meanwhile, B6 and B12 play important roles in producing blood cells and the health of the nervous system. Both of these consequential vitamins are frequently depleted by years of heavy drinking.

http://www.besthealthnews.com/vitamins-for-the-recovering-alcoholic

RD

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I believe that when an addict is recovering from drugs or alcohol, taking a high dose regiment of B vitamins is essential. 

You may be referring to Korsakoff's syndrome ...

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Korsakoff's syndrome (Korsakoff's psychosis), is a brain disorder caused by the lack of thiamine (vitamin B1) in the brain. The syndrome is named after Sergei Korsakoff, the neuropsychiatrist who popularized the theory... Conditions resulting in the vitamin deficiency and its effects include chronic alcoholism, and severe malnutrition. Alcoholism is often an indicator of poor nutrition, which in addition to inflammation of the stomach lining, causes thiamine deficiency.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korsakoff's_syndrome

DoctorBeaver

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Oooh, a thread for lil ol' me to get my teeth into!

Vitamin C is very good for recovering alcoholics. Its efficacy in treating recovering drug addicts is more debateable but still worth pursuing.

AS RD's quote points out, a lack of vitamin B8 can be a contributory factor in alcoholism so it makes sense to ensure levels are adequate.

It should be noted, however, that alcohol depletes all soluble vitamins in the body so it is not just C & B8 that should be supplemented. This is especially true in the early stages of withdrawal. Alcohol also prevents the pancreas secreting digestive enzymes that help the body break down food to obtain the nutrients from it. It also damages cells in the stomach and intestines and this prevents absorption of nutrients. A course of multi-vit and/or Diorylite is efficacious in restoring levels.

In addition to other treatments, I introduced a recommendation that in the early stages of usage cessation the patient try to take frequent saunas and I had saunas installed at several of our outreach project buildings. The reason I did that is because some drug residues can be stored in the body's fatty tissue, sometimes for years, and may continue to cause cravings and, in some cases, side-effects such as depression; and depression itself can cause the patient to revert to alcohol abuse. Regular, frequent saunas help remove these residues.

« Last Edit: 25/02/2009 06:21:15 by DoctorBeaver »

JimBob

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What vitamins are needed during drug and alcohol withdrawal?
« Reply #5 on: 21/12/2009 00:44:32 »
Considering the nature of the addictied brain, the person trying to stop  will most likely not like to see a doctor. But if a person has once had convulsions or very bad withdrawals, DT's or delirium tremens can cause death. That requires hospitalization if they begin.

It is best to avoid these at all costs. But if the person is absolutely unwilling to enter treatment this person should ... 


... enroll in a recovery program or attend as many support groups (AA, NA, CA, 12 Steps, etc) as is necessary to remain clean and sober.

It was customary before the advent of treatment facilities in the early '80's for members of the groups mentioned above to help the addict to recover by "baby-sitting" them.

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Persons who try to detox “at home” run the risk of days or weeks or months of needless suffering, of relapsing and, in the case of alcoholism, of the risk of dying from cold-turkey withdrawal.

This is an absolutely true statement. But if the addict will not - or financially cannot - get treatment, the following process can be tried. IT CAN ONLY WORK IF THERE IS A WILLINGNESS OF THE ADDICT TO STOP.

Ninety-nine point nine nine percent of the time the addict cannot do it by themselves. Previously, persons who have been through the recovery process themselves often "pay back" their debt to others who helped them by doing the baby-sitting. First these people pour out ever drop of alcohol available to the alcoholic. This is most often not necessary as it has usually already been consumed. These people will save or buy a pint or two of some whiskey and sit with the person who is willing to detox. Every hour a large water glass of orange juice and two or three tablespoons of honey are given the alcoholic. When the real "shakes" begin, and ounce of whiskey is doled out to the alcoholic. Depending on the severity, this is done for a couple of hours, then the period between shots is increased until no alcohol is consumed. This process can take two or three days, days without sleep for the patient.

After the person has "dried out" they should continue to be in the company of like-minded people for several days, preferably months and years. It takes three to five years for behaviors to change sufficiently for a good recovery to begin. They should not be left to their own devices and allowed to convince themselves that they are better off drunk. Nor should they associate with the persons they once associated with, nor go to the same places where they used to hang out, or practice the same behavior they have in the past. Becoming sober does not change behavior. A thief will still be a thief. This is where the new associates of one of the groups Dave mentioned is absolutely necessary. They have a process that, when used, that can be used to change the behavior of the addict. 

AGAIN DO NOT TRY THIS YOURSELF! Some sober personS should always be around just in case the worse happens and the convulsions of the DT's begin. AND THIS PROCESS SHOULD BE THE LAST RESORT.

One last note. A book will NOT give one sobriety. One cannot think themselves into a new way of acting, especially with the impairment of chemical addiction to the brain. This past year some yahoo has been advertising an easy way to stop your addiction on TV. There is no easy way.

It is worth the effort, though.
« Last Edit: 21/12/2009 00:46:21 by JimBob »

JimBob

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What vitamins are needed during drug and alcohol withdrawal?
« Reply #6 on: 22/12/2009 21:24:50 »
I guess I am just too old to be anything but old school!

camille101

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What vitamins are needed during drug and alcohol withdrawal?
« Reply #7 on: 05/03/2010 03:54:25 »
Vitamin B is really essential to those who are in a recovery on addiction from alcohol and drugs. I've red an article that this could help our brain and nervous system to properly function and even Vitamin C to detoxifies our body and to lessen our crave on drugs.

Camille Jude


mod - Spam removed, site blacklisted, user banned - thanks for helping us to fight spam by showing us which sites to blacklist - now, nobody can post that site again!
« Last Edit: 05/03/2010 09:39:07 by BenV »

GreysonA

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First of all, I'd like to say that quitting opiate addiction is all about your will power. If you have that, you can move mountains. A friend I know had to endure massive opiate withdrawal symptoms for a big period of time. After going cold turkey, he realized he couldn't do this alone, so we started looking for something natural that could help him through the process. Shortly after, we found a blog about opiate withdrawal and how to get off opiates: http://withdrawalaid.com/blog/ . They also recommend these withdrawal aid natural pills that actually work. You should give them a try.

 

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