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Author Topic: Does the high surface tension provides elasticity  (Read 3103 times)

Offline erickejah

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People can walk in mercury  :o, thanks to its high surface tension.
If the same element is put at 4.3 it becomes solid:
1. would it retain the same surface characteristic?
2. If it retains the characteristic would it have elasticity?


 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Does the high surface tension provides elasticity
« Reply #1 on: 04/02/2009 04:01:30 »
They can't actually 'walk in' mercury. Only one person has sat on it (as far as I know anyway)
 

lyner

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Does the high surface tension provides elasticity
« Reply #2 on: 04/02/2009 09:37:44 »
The reason you can 'sit' on mercury is because it is extremely DENSE; you float just the same as in water.
But there is an awful lot of 'upthrust' (most favouritest School Science word ever)- 13.6 times as much as water.
 

Offline erickejah

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Does the high surface tension provides elasticity
« Reply #3 on: 04/02/2009 13:30:06 »
okay. ;D
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Does the high surface tension provides elasticity
« Reply #3 on: 04/02/2009 13:30:06 »

 

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