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Author Topic: Should you avoid storing certain chemicals together?  (Read 2535 times)

Wanda Zippler

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Wanda Zippler  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hi Chris and Crew
 
I enjoy USAyour show!
 
I have heard that you should never store your car break fluid for your car anywhere near your pool chlorine because if they ever make contact it will after a few minutes catch on fire.  Is this true? If it is why does it happen?

I also know that you should never store bleach and ammonia together. Are there any other common household chemicals I should keep separate from one another?
 
Thank You
Wanda Zippler
North Augusta South Carolina

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Chemistry4me

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Should you avoid storing certain chemicals together?
« Reply #1 on: 06/02/2009 07:35:28 »
Calcium hypochlorite and polyethylene glycol?

Chemistry4me

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Should you avoid storing certain chemicals together?
« Reply #2 on: 06/02/2009 07:37:57 »
Have a look at these jokers! :D

lightarrow

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Don_1

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Should you avoid storing certain chemicals together?
« Reply #4 on: 09/02/2009 15:41:24 »
Flamables should be kept well apart from oxidising agents. For example spirit based cleaners and thinners should be stored well away from peroxides.

This is one example of the 'Carriage of Dangerous Goods Regulations', which states that Class 3 (Flamable liquids) and Class 4 (Flamable solids) cannot be carried on a vehicle carrying Class 5 (Oxidising agents). Odd though, when I last applied for the ADR license to carry such goods, I was astounded to find that Class 6 (Poisons) can be carried on the same vehicle as one carrying Class 8 (Corrosives).

I pointed out to the 'so called' instructor, that I had once refused to load some Class 8 because I was already carrying Class 6. "WHY?" he asked. I explained that the Class 6 I was carrying was 1000kgs of Potassium Cyanide for the photographic industry, the Class 8 I was to load from another collection point was to prepare Aluminium for painting and contained Acetic Acid. "And what's the problem with that?" enquired the know-all instructor.

So much for the Carriage of Dangerous Goods Regulations.

I no longer carry hazardous cargo, in fact I stick exclusively to exhibitions now.

blakestyger

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Should you avoid storing certain chemicals together?
« Reply #5 on: 09/02/2009 16:05:36 »
Have a look at these jokers! :D

Typical youngsters of today - no lab coats or eye protection. ::)

 

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