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Author Topic: What happens to the time if I can travel faster than speed of light?  (Read 9597 times)

Offline lightarrow

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This is a troll question.

You must be aware that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light to form the question in the first place, so knowing this, why are you asking about something that you already understand to be impossible?

You must be aware that nothing can travel with the speed of light ...
Why?

Quote
then why Dr.Einstein and every one think about traveling @ the c ?
About why exactly he thought it, you should ask him, and since this is already meaningless, so it's your question. About the others, I don't know.
About *physics* there are many reasons, but I've the suspect that you already know them and so I won't bore you again.
Regards.
 

ScientificBoysClub

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Oo-er...  that's spooky;  the original question has been heavily edited in the light of some of the responses to it, just like re-writing history.  That's usually bad karma  ;)

no way the edited word was  only space ... it was space and time and now its only time ........ the the heck
?      what's wrong with u ? ask any one !! ..
 

lyner

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This is a troll question.

You must be aware that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light to form the question in the first place, so knowing this, why are you asking about something that you already understand to be impossible?
This is NO TROLL QUESTION ...... WHAT KIND OF PEOPLE ARE YOU ... IF U R STUDYING PHYSICS YOU SHOULD THINK IN ALL POSSIBLE WAYS AND ANGLES .....
If, every day you wake up, you are prepared to go haring off in any direction in your studies then you will never get anywhere. Until there is very strong evidence to the contrary - and I defy anyone to produce any - then we go along with the 'c limit'.
If, one day, someone produces an experimental result which can only be explained by a ftl solution then everything will change.
Meanwhile, the view that 'anything is up for grabs'  is not real Science.
 

Offline BenV

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Okay everyone - I appreciate how any answer to this question would be pure speculation, but I believe that ScientificBoysClub's intention was not to troll the forum with it.

I've shrunk the posts about trolling, but how about we approach this in a different way...

What would happen to mass and energy as we approach the speed of light?

Why is c an unbreakable speed limit? 
 

Offline Vern

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I have a speculative notion about why mass can't exceed the speed of light; that is that the most fundamental constituents of mass is light.

I think even in the mainstream QM theory Quarks are held together by Gluons which must always move at the speed of light. Nothing can move faster than its constituent parts can move. That's the way I think of it anyway.

 
 

Offline yor_on

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Let's start with BenV:s last question.
"Why is c an unbreakable speed limit?"

The discussion of what our universe and light consists of and lights possible speed is a long one historically. The Michelson–Morley experiment is what one could say starting the modern view of our universe, made in 1887 by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley. It was primarily made to test the idea of an aether, but in its conclusion it also gave a good aproximation of lights speed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelson-Morley_experiment

Albert Einstein didn't conjure his ideas from a hat, he built on what was known and created his vision.
1905 in his special theory of relativity he proposed that nothing could exceed the speed of light in a vacuum  (186,000 miles a second). "Einstein's theory of relativity together with the principle of causality requires that no matter or information can travel faster than the speed of light. Speeds faster than that of light are encountered in physics but, in all such cases, no matter or information is transmitted faster than c." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_light

There have been experiments testing this theory as the question nowadays circulate around the idea of 'information'. In all FTL experiments the ground is that no information will travel faster than light. This principle have been seen to be correct even for such experiments as 'entanglements'. There will always be clever schemes trying to take advantage of that phenomena but as far as I've seen no experiment yet has succeeded using entanglement for passing information faster than c.
 
Here is one example of testing the idea of information traveling at FTL from 2003.
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=12797

As for the first question, according to to Einstein's theory the increasing kinetic energy will be equivalent to an increasing mass, and that goes for all kinds of acceleration, rotational as well as 'straight' ones. What that means is that there is no limit to lights barrier, it's not like the sound barrier that can be broken giving the correct speed under a 'specific weather condition'. What happens with accelerating mass is that when your speed increase so will your mass, and to go past lights speed your mass will have to be infinite.
http://helios.gsfc.nasa.gov/qa_gp_sl.html#rotlight
« Last Edit: 10/02/2009 01:23:31 by yor_on »
 

Offline Vern

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Sounds good to me yor_on; I see no problem with your concepts here.
 

ScientificBoysClub

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Okay everyone - I appreciate how any answer to this question would be pure speculation, but I believe that ScientificBoysClub's intention was not to troll the forum with it.

I've shrunk the posts about trolling, but how about we approach this in a different way...

What would happen to mass and energy as we approach the speed of light?

Why is c an unbreakable speed limit? 
Thanks a lot for understanding me !!
 

Offline LeeE

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Why is c an unbreakable speed limit?

There are two aspects to this question; the first is why is there a finite speed limit, and the second is why is 'c' the value that it is, and not a different value?

If there was not a finite speed limit it would not be possible to resolve anything.  It's important to remember that infinitely fast is not the same as instantaneous; infinite speed would still require a non-zero journey time and even though the journey time would be infinitely small it would still be greater than zero, which would be the case with instantaneous movement.  So with infinitely fast movement, all journeys would take the same nominal time, which would be infinitely small, regardless of the length of the journey.  This would then in turn mean that regardless of traveling at the same nominal infinite speed, two journeys of different length would have to be traveled at different speeds for them to take the same time.  In the end, it's only consistent and only works if you only use infinities and don't try to use any real numbers.

As to why 'c' is the value that is is and not a different value; I think that's open to debate.  Considering just how fundamental it seems to be to how the universe seems to work, I'm inclined to think that everything that depends on 'c' being the value that it is and not some other value is derived from 'c', so if 'c' was a different value everything that depended on it would still work.  In this respect, the value of 'c' is abstract because everything by which we measure it depends upon it, so it can only be described in terms of itself.
« Last Edit: 10/02/2009 17:48:12 by LeeE »
 

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