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Author Topic: Time - Unidirectional, isn't it?  (Read 4159 times)

Offline Fluid_thinker

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Time - Unidirectional, isn't it?
« on: 24/02/2009 16:45:01 »
Driving to work I was trying to runa thought experiment on time.

If you travel faster than the speed of light then you can over take the current time and return back to observe the older time. But surely you are only observing a previous time continuum that you have overtaken. Time stays unidirectional, i.e. it moves forwards.

Is there any theories or ideas that show that time could be reversed, as opposed to overtaken?


 

Offline JP

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Time - Unidirectional, isn't it?
« Reply #1 on: 24/02/2009 17:23:55 »
As far as real scientific theories go, you can't travel faster than the speed of light.  Period. 
 

Offline lightarrow

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Time - Unidirectional, isn't it?
« Reply #2 on: 24/02/2009 17:30:19 »
Driving to work I was trying to runa thought experiment on time.

If you travel faster than the speed of light then you can over take the current time and return back to observe the older time.
Sorry, but how fast were you driving?  :)

Quote
But surely you are only observing a previous time continuum that you have overtaken. Time stays unidirectional, i.e. it moves forwards.

Is there any theories or ideas that show that time could be reversed, as opposed to overtaken?
At the microscopic level time can move both ways.
 

Offline Don_1

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Time - Unidirectional, isn't it?
« Reply #3 on: 24/02/2009 17:42:17 »


Excuse me sir, are you aware that you were driving above the speed of light in a speed of sound zone?

I'm afraid I shall have to take your particulars down.



Your not getting your hands on my particulars!!!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Time - Unidirectional, isn't it?
« Reply #4 on: 24/02/2009 20:08:22 »
LAWKS, it's the rozzers!
 

Offline LeeE

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Time - Unidirectional, isn't it?
« Reply #5 on: 24/02/2009 20:17:22 »
Time is a direction in which you move and the phenomenon of relativistic time-dilation indicates that space and time are identical because the time-dilation phenomenon is the consequence of the summation of the movement vectors through time and space where the sum of the vectors is always the speed of light 'c'.  Thus, if you are stationary in space you are traveling at 'c' in the time direction but as you start to move through space the rate at which you move through time must decrease to maintain the summed vector value of 'c'.

As your spatial vector approaches 'c' your temporal vector approaches zero, but this has an important effect on energy conservation, which is dependent upon the temporal vector speed, so as your spatial vector approaches 'c' and your temporal vector approaches zero, the energy values approach infinity, imposing an upper limit that cannot be exceeded as it would require infinite energy.

If you plot the curve of the temporal vector against the spatial vector you get a quadrant of a circle but if you try to extend the curve past the point where the temporal vector becomes zero i.e. at the point where the spatial vector = 'c', you end up needing to find the square root of a negative number, which you can't, to sum the vectors, and which may be why time is unidirectional.
 

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Time - Unidirectional, isn't it?
« Reply #5 on: 24/02/2009 20:17:22 »

 

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