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Author Topic: Leaving secondary teaching  (Read 5584 times)

Offline Damo the Optics Monkey

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« on: 26/02/2009 10:07:55 »
I have been a class-slave..erm.. i mean teacher for 10 years... teaching Physics, Science, Math, IT and Special Ed... as such, in this profession, it makes me a rare breed.

And like so many people in the rare breed classes of teaching, I am becoming very aware that the daily insults, put downs, non-recognised achievements etc - of which I do 11 hours a day for 7 hours pay etc are seriously not worth it....

In a couple of years time, I plan not only to leave the school I am at now,but leave the profession altogether...

I am trained in physics (soon to have a Masters), climatology and geology - so I may go back to industry, or be a lecturer or something...


 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #1 on: 26/02/2009 13:48:55 »
You are a brave man for having stuck at for so long. Highschool teaching is not a profession I would relish. I took the easy option and lectured at uni for a while (while I was doing my PhD). At least the students there want to be there and most don't carry knives.

Before I became ill I was planning to go abroad, probably Spain, to teach English. I note you have set your location as Japan. I know for a fact that Japan is crying out for American EFL teachers (British EFL teachers won't get a job there). Maybe that is something you could consider. Teaching English to businessmen can be very lucrative. There are also many opportunities in that field in China and South Korea where the salary is likewise very good.

Whatever you opt for, I wish you the best of luck.
« Last Edit: 26/02/2009 13:51:11 by DoctorBeaver »
 

Offline BenV

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« Reply #2 on: 26/02/2009 13:50:24 »
What's wrong with us Brits?
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #3 on: 26/02/2009 13:55:15 »
Ben - If you are referring to British EFL teachers not being employed in Japan it is solely that they want to learn American English not English English. It is not a slur on the quality of British teachers, simply that the Japanese have the most contact with Americans. Native English speakers get confused between British English & American English vocabularyand it must be doubly hard for a non-native speaker.
 

Offline BenV

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« Reply #4 on: 26/02/2009 13:58:14 »
I did some teaching out in Thailand and although the best English speakers did use American vocab, and slight American accents, they were very keen to have British English teachers, as they thought of it as more 'proper'.  I'm surprised it isn't the same in Japan.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #5 on: 26/02/2009 14:07:47 »
I looked into EFL all over the world and that's what I invariably found. In some countries they won't have anyone but British EFL teachers.
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #6 on: 26/02/2009 15:52:06 »
I looked into EFL all over the world and that's what I invariably found. In some countries they won't have anyone but British EFL teachers.

Jolly well snobish, I say!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #7 on: 26/02/2009 16:02:23 »
I looked into EFL all over the world and that's what I invariably found. In some countries they won't have anyone but British EFL teachers.

Jolly well snobish, I say!

If wanting the best is snobbish, then yes.
 

Offline Damo the Optics Monkey

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« Reply #8 on: 26/02/2009 19:53:46 »
actually, I am neither an American nor Brit - I am an Australian :)

 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #9 on: 26/02/2009 20:15:37 »
My apologies. What the hell made me think you were American?  ???
 

Offline Damo the Optics Monkey

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« Reply #10 on: 26/02/2009 20:18:29 »
no apologies needed, good sir! 

Do people have any advice regarding what fields I could consider?
 

Offline Make it Lady

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« Reply #11 on: 26/02/2009 23:37:36 »
My husband taught specialised English in Japan. He is a pharmacist and taught pharmaceutical and business English. There are lots of language schools out there but shop around. Sadly the Japanese are not so keen on an Australian accent but as most of them can't tell British accents from Australian you might get away with not saying which nationality you are.
 

Offline Damo the Optics Monkey

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« Reply #12 on: 27/02/2009 00:14:57 »
I am actually more keen to get away from teaching altogether and to get back into industry (preferably one with minimal human contact)
 

Offline RD

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« Reply #13 on: 27/02/2009 03:48:49 »
I know for a fact that Japan is crying out for American EFL teachers ... Teaching English to businessmen can be very lucrative.

If you can teach Japanese businessmen to pronounce "very lucrative" correctly then you will be doing well  :)
« Last Edit: 27/02/2009 03:52:50 by RD »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #14 on: 27/02/2009 09:18:33 »
I know for a fact that Japan is crying out for American EFL teachers ... Teaching English to businessmen can be very lucrative.

If you can teach Japanese businessmen to pronounce "very lucrative" correctly then you will be doing well  :)

 

Offline Damo the Optics Monkey

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« Reply #15 on: 27/02/2009 09:29:06 »
LMAO!!  from experience, that could be a challenge
 

Offline Karsten

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« Reply #16 on: 27/02/2009 12:59:04 »
I am actually more keen to get away from teaching altogether and to get back into industry (preferably one with minimal human contact)

I am surprised you became a teacher if you now prefer minimal human contact. You either got burned out well, or you initially picked the wrong profession. It is hard to teach in the public school system. It is close to impossible (and would be for me as well) to do it without proper support outside of the classroom. Teachers cannot do it alone. You sometimes need to be able to get a student out of the classroom. Discipline issues need to be addressed consistently school-wide, not only in your classroom. If not all staff members (teaching and non-teaching staff) are not on the same page it just does not work well. And then there is society. A school is only as good as society wants it to be. Where I live the school budget is supported by local taxpayers and is voted on every year. We constantly need to convince the local population that what we do is good for their kids. And often they think little of education. It is difficult to teach if your students go home to spend time with parents who care little about school and have overall much more influence than teachers.
 

Offline Damo the Optics Monkey

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« Reply #17 on: 27/02/2009 13:10:47 »
it has been progressive - an increase in cynicism and dispondency.

Although I will gladly give up my lunch time and go n early to help my students (which I do every weekday), it is often not the students that are the most draining part of the job - particularly in International education
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #18 on: 27/02/2009 13:41:14 »
1 of the things I didn't like about lecturing at uni was the internal politics. Another was the ceaseless stream of inane missives from the Dept of Education about political correctness matters; most of which were complete BLX.

I was once berated for referring to a ginger-haired lesbian in 1 of my classes as a ginger-haired lesbian. I was speaking to a colleague about various students and when I said her name he didn't recognise it. I said "You know, the ginger-haired lesbian". So I wasn't being disparaging, merely describing her in order to identify her. Nope, not allowed. PAH!
« Last Edit: 27/02/2009 13:43:26 by DoctorBeaver »
 

Offline RD

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« Reply #19 on: 27/02/2009 14:05:09 »
Is it cos I is ginger ...
feature=related   :)
« Last Edit: 27/02/2009 14:08:37 by RD »
 

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« Reply #19 on: 27/02/2009 14:05:09 »

 

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