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Author Topic: What would happen to me if I stand before LHC particles which travel with C ?  (Read 12244 times)

ScientificBoysClub

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What would happen to me if I stand before LHC particles collide with C ?
 

if I stood before a particle traveling with high velocity as light (C) ... what would happen if they will collide with my atoms which r present in my body ?
« Last Edit: 01/03/2009 12:36:10 by ScientificBoysClub »


 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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I don't think you would enjoy the experience and I would strongly advise against trying it. You may find that nasty things would happen to the atoms in your body.

The LHC smashes particles together and as a result they get rather splattered. I hate to imagine what would happen to you if the particles inside you were splattered the same way.
« Last Edit: 01/03/2009 12:46:45 by DoctorBeaver »
 

Offline ukmicky

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Im probably wrong but wouldnt the particles  fired by the LHC just go straight through you leaving very little evidence of their passage .
 

Offline yor_on

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" particle traveling with high velocity as light (C) " can only mean one thing SBC and that's light, or in this case, 'hard radiation' very energetic radiation as X-rays or gamma rays. The term 'hard' is meant to depict its ability to penetrate thick isolation, for example a lead shield. Standing in front of that kind of radiation has already been done, at Hiroshima and Nagasaki for example, with disastrous effects on life.

So even though that beams thickness might be very small it might introduce genetic changes in your cells, like cancer.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Quote
" particle traveling with high velocity as light (C) " can only mean one thing SBC and that's light

The LHC will collide protons or heavy ions.
 

Online syhprum

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The unfortunate jr member of the Scientific BoysClub would have 350MJ of energy dumped into him with unpleasant results.

http://lhc-machine-outreach.web.cern.ch/lhc-machine-outreach/components/beam-dump.htm
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Is that what the CERN community call having a dump?  ;D
 

Offline Bored chemist

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How much of the beam's energy would be dissipated and how much would be still carried by the protons after they had gone through you?
After all, as someone has already said, you need a lot of sheilding to stop that beam. A person wouldn't stop it, they would just slow it down a bit.

It still wouldn't be a good idea to try it.

Incidentally, how do you stand in front of a circle?
 

Offline lightarrow

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What would happen to me if I stand before LHC particles collide with C ?
 

if I stood before a particle traveling with high velocity as light (C) ... what would happen if they will collide with my atoms which r present in my body ?
Essentially, you would feel the effects of an exposition to radiation: vomit, loose of hairs, ecc ecc.
 

Offline JP

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When I did a bit of undergraduate research at the particle accelerator in Fermilab, I heard stories about someone who had been zapped with such a beam.  Thanks to the wonders of Wikipedia, I can now get more info on it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatoli_Bugorski

It sounds like a combination of having a hole burned in you by the beam itself and radiation exposure.  Ouch!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Ouch indeed  [xx(]
 

Offline yor_on

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LHC Mr Beaver will get ..no.. particles up to 'c'.

If that particular particle isn't a boson, naturally.
In which case I will be wrong, but yet, so very right.
As that, that, is light:)
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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I never said the particles would reach c and I know that they can't. They will reach 0.999997828 c. (Someone else can work out what that is in metres per second :P )
 

Offline yor_on

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DB.
With all proper respect, I absolutely refuse to 'work that one out' :)
My head is nowadays a vacant lot still waiting for the tenant to come home ::))
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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LeeE likes maths. He can do it ;D
 

Offline lightarrow

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When I did a bit of undergraduate research at the particle accelerator in Fermilab, I heard stories about someone who had been zapped with such a beam.  Thanks to the wonders of Wikipedia, I can now get more info on it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatoli_Bugorski
What amazes me (among other things) about him and his accident, is this:

"In 1996, he applied unsuccessfully for disabled status, to receive his free epilepsy medication".

So, in Russia you are not considered disabled even after been shot by a "particle beam cannon"!
« Last Edit: 02/03/2009 16:11:35 by lightarrow »
 

Offline lightarrow

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I never said the particles would reach c and I know that they can't. They will reach 0.999997828 c. (Someone else can work out what that is in metres per second :P )
299,791,806.850781224 m/s
 

Online syhprum

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Proton beams are used for the destruction of cancer tumours where they have the advantage of being well focused and stopping at the appropriate depth.
I understand that a beam energy of 25 to 250 Mev is used somewhat less than is available from the LHC.
It has been suggested that antiprotons be used but due to the high cost of generating them it has not been tested.   
 

Offline ukmicky

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From someone with very little knowledge of sub atomic particles, how small is one of these protons fired by the LHC and how many are being fired. Because I thought a proton was so small that they would pass through us without interacting with the Atoms that we are made of, with very little change of hitting anything.
If they are as small as i think how would they discharge any of their energy if we were to stand in their way.

« Last Edit: 02/03/2009 18:17:52 by ukmicky »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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I never said the particles would reach c and I know that they can't. They will reach 0.999997828 c. (Someone else can work out what that is in metres per second :P )
299,791,806.850781224 m/s



I assume that is the speed in a vacuum. Now what is it in water at sea-level?  ;D
 

Offline JP

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From someone with very little knowledge of sub atomic particles, how small is one of these protons fired by the LHC and how many are being fired. Because I thought a proton was so small that they would pass through us without interacting with the toms that we are made of, with very little change of hitting anything.
If they are as small as i think how would they discharge any of their energy if we were to stand in their way.

As far as subatomic particles go, protons are large, massive, and have a charge.  These three things make them pretty dangerous.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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LHC Mr Beaver will get ..no.. particles up to 'c'.

If that particular particle isn't a boson, naturally.
In which case I will be wrong, but yet, so very right.
As that, that, is light:)

The LHC will produce stacks of synchrotron radiation all of which will travel at C (at least while it's still in the vacuum chamber).
I strongly suspect that more photons of radiation will be emited than protons (pr whatever) will be accelerated so the great majority of the particles leaving the LHC will be photons moving at C.

Incidentally, since you are largely made of protons the chance for energy transfer from a fast proton to you is rather large.

In water at sea level the speed is about 3/4 times C- it depends on the teperature. Since the beam from the LHC has a kinetic energy roughly equivaenet to a speeding train and yet it's only a milimetre or so across, the water isn't likely to stay at room temperature for long.
« Last Edit: 02/03/2009 19:19:49 by Bored chemist »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Apparently the beam will have the energy of a Subaru Impreza being driven at 1,700kph
 

Offline lightarrow

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Apparently the beam will have the energy of a Subaru Impreza being driven at 1,700kph
Do you want to put an LHC under your car's bonnet?  :)
 

Offline lightarrow

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I never said the particles would reach c and I know that they can't. They will reach 0.999997828 c. (Someone else can work out what that is in metres per second :P )
299,791,806.850781224 m/s



I assume that is the speed in a vacuum. Now what is it in water at sea-level?  ;D
299,791,806.850781224/1.333 m/s = 224,900,080.15812544936234058514629 m/s
 

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