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Author Topic: What would happen to me if I stand before LHC particles which travel with C ?  (Read 12293 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

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I never said the particles would reach c and I know that they can't. They will reach 0.999997828 c. (Someone else can work out what that is in metres per second :P )
299,791,806.850781224 m/s



I assume that is the speed in a vacuum. Now what is it in water at sea-level?  ;D
299,791,806.850781224/1.333 m/s = 224,900,080.15812544936234058514629 m/s

Now you're showing off!
 

Offline ukmicky

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Incidentally, since you are largely made of protons the chance for energy transfer from a fast proton to you is rather large.
Bored

Even though we are mostly made of Protons for the proton to transfer energy wouldnt it have to hit something as it passed through .  I thought that as a proton is much smaller than an atom a proton flying through an atom would be like a spacecraft flying through our solar system with so much space between everything that the chances are it would miss everything and fly right through.

I take it my thoughts were wrong. ;D
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Micky - I would have thought that the sheer number of atoms in a human body would have made some kind of collision almost inevitable; especially considering the width of the beam.
 

Offline yor_on

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Ok, quite impressive.

B u t ...
In Leap seconds Ligharrow.

What 'Exactly' would it be in leap seconds, nota bene, accounting for how seldom they come too.
 

Offline lightarrow

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Ok, quite impressive.

B u t ...
In Leap seconds Ligharrow.

What 'Exactly' would it be in leap seconds, nota bene, accounting for how seldom they come too.

???
 

Offline yor_on

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:)

Hmm http://maia.usno.navy.mil/eo/leapsec.html
*Just my sense of humor*
Slightly fried :)
 

Offline syhprum

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"Even though we are mostly made of Protons", this got me thinking although elements up to at least Oxygen seem to have an equal number of Protons to Neutrons as the atomic mass increases neutrons predominate so that it is truer to say that we are mostly made of Neutrons.
 

Online Bored chemist

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By a long way, the most common type of atomic nucleus in the human body is the proton.
Because it has the same mass (as near as makes no difference) as the incoming proton the energy transfer is quite efficient. A proton hitting a big heavy nucleus is likely to bounce off. A proton hitting a single electron will plough on essentially without noticing.

In much the same way that hydrogen is good at moderating neutrons, it's good at stopping protons.

Incidentally, by (roughly) how many metres per second are the protons at CERN slower than the speed of light?
« Last Edit: 04/03/2009 18:35:05 by Bored chemist »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Incidentally, by (roughly) how many metres per second are the protons at CERN slower than the speed of light?

And how many holes does it take to fill the Albert Hall?
 

Offline syhprum

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I apologise I was in error, I did not take into effect the high proportion of Neutron less Hydrogen that constitutes the human body.
 

lyner

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How can this scenario be real? The accelerator uses a vacuum. You'd have to be in there with the particles.
How do they get a beam of protons to get into a body - for the same reason?

High speed particles, on impact with a dense material, would produce Cherenkov radiation as they slow up to below the speed of light in the material.
 

Online Bored chemist

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Incidentally, by (roughly) how many metres per second are the protons at CERN slower than the speed of light?

And how many holes does it take to fill the Albert Hall?
There seems to be some evidence supporting an estimate of ten thousand (previously arranged for counting in Blackburn Lancashire).

I think the problem with standing in front of the beam (since it's in a vacuum chamber) is related to the one about standing in front of something that's circular.
Of course, if you switched off the magnetic field the beam would carry on in a straight line, probably punch a hole in the wall and carry on through the air for a considerable distance. You could stand in front of that beam (once).
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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I think the problem with standing in front of the beam (since it's in a vacuum chamber) is related to the one about standing in front of something that's circular.
Of course, if you switched off the magnetic field the beam would carry on in a straight line, probably punch a hole in the wall and carry on through the air for a considerable distance. You could stand in front of that beam (once).

Rather you than me, matey!
 

Offline ukmicky

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Thankyou for your replies.

The reason i assumed they would not do much damage to us was because i read that when passing through matter they were classed as an (Let) Low linear energy transfer. And therefore passed straight through us with very little effects.
« Last Edit: 05/03/2009 22:47:03 by ukmicky »
 

lyner

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Bearing in mind how strongly ionising Alpha particles are (He++), it is not likely that H+ particles would pass through any matter without interacting.
Neutrons, on the other hand. . . . But you can't accelerate them at CERN, I think.
 

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