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Author Topic: Does a neutron ask May I ?  (Read 1900 times)

Offline Vern

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Does a neutron ask May I ?
« on: 06/03/2009 15:53:03 »
The May I theory works like a packet switching network. In such networks; like the internet for example; the sending device is not allowed to send a packet of data indiscriminately, but must first get permission from the receiving device.

So, in the May I theory, when an electron would like to rid itself of a photon, it must first find an acceptable phase relationship in a receiving electron. This negotiation happens at the speed of light. Only when an acceptable phase relationship is found, does a packet of energy instantly transfer between sending electron and receiving electron. The transfer is instant at the sender and receiver with nothing of substance happening in the intervening space.

This concept expands to beta decay, explaining why the act of observation can affect the instant of the decay. Acceptable receivers for the released energy must first be negotiated before it can happen.

Okay; I just now made this up, so don't get the Nobel shined up yet :)   
« Last Edit: 11/03/2009 18:33:52 by Vern »


 

lyner

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Re: Does a neutron ask May I ?
« Reply #1 on: 06/03/2009 23:41:19 »
How does this idea square up with the light you see from distant galaxies? The negociation would take millions of years (twice as long as with the accepted system).

You can put your Mum's photo back in the space you were making on your mantlepiece.
 

Offline Vern

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Re: Does a neutron ask May I ?
« Reply #2 on: 07/03/2009 00:15:57 »
Well the negotiation would be settled at the speed of light; once settled the transfer would be instantaneous. This scheme was more of spoof than a serious hypothesis, but it is curious that it can not be dismissed easily. We have no way to detect the existence of energy transfer without taking its measure. Once we take its measure, we provide the mechanism for the negotiated transfer. :)
« Last Edit: 07/03/2009 01:34:31 by Vern »
 

lyner

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Re: Does a neutron ask May I ?
« Reply #3 on: 07/03/2009 11:21:35 »
It's certainly true to say that, once a photon has interacted with a system, it isn't available for any more business. That information must permeate the Universe instantaneously.
 

Offline Vern

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Re: Does a neutron ask May I ?
« Reply #4 on: 07/03/2009 13:19:54 »
Yes; that's what started me wondering about this. According to Feynman a photon seems to be everywhere at once until it interacts with something. As you say, once it interacts it is done and will not interact at any other place.

It does seem unlikely that this May-I communication might take place across billions of light years; but if it can happen a foot away, why not a mile, why not ...

I've seen Fourier analysis studies where various objects are placed in the path of a projector and the effects on the projected image analysed. This might be an argument against such a May-I scheme.

And then I get back to Beta decay; why is it that the act of observation affects the instant of decay? Maybe the neutron needs permission and the act of observation provides it. :)
 

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Re: Does a neutron ask May I ?
« Reply #4 on: 07/03/2009 13:19:54 »

 

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