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Author Topic: Bubbles that sink - Antibubbles - Kitchen Science  (Read 12009 times)

thedoc

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Make fascinating bubbles which rather than floating on water actually sink.

Read more about this kitchen science experiment.

Listen to the Experiment Part 1 Part 2 Part 3
...or download as MP3 [1] [2] [3]
« Last Edit: 13/07/2010 13:44:26 by _system »

paul.fr

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Bubbles that sink - Antibubbles - Kitchen Science
« Reply #1 on: 10/03/2009 19:25:59 »
Ahhh, I like this one, Dave.

Anastasia did something similar to this a few months ago, and we found that adding food colouring to the mixture made it easier to see the antibubbles...I think I have some pictures somewhere...

daveshorts

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Bubbles that sink - Antibubbles - Kitchen Science
« Reply #2 on: 11/03/2009 13:27:08 »
Yes it would certainly make them more visible, I quite like the pure and simple as you can see what is going on better...

Apparently you can squirt much bigger ones if you get the flow rate and angle right, but I haven't managed it.

archie bishop

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Bubbles that sink - Antibubbles - Kitchen Science
« Reply #3 on: 01/04/2009 21:26:21 »
That is very interesting did you come up with that?

daveshorts

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Bubbles that sink - Antibubbles - Kitchen Science
« Reply #4 on: 14/04/2009 17:02:34 »
Actually I met some irish schoolchildren making them in a science competition in Dublin 4 or 5 years ago. Although I was aware of the skittering antibubbles on the surface for a lot longer than that.

Marono

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« Reply #5 on: 24/04/2009 10:35:42 »
Yo yo, this is da bomb, literally

ginge

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« Reply #6 on: 03/05/2009 12:44:53 »
that's wicked!

Mystery person

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« Reply #7 on: 25/10/2009 21:39:22 »
That's pretty neat...

brittany

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« Reply #8 on: 03/11/2009 16:16:10 »
this science projects sucks

mama1

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« Reply #9 on: 05/02/2010 10:33:08 »
WHATS your inspiration to do this "antibubbles"?

NUN OF UR BUISNESS

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« Reply #10 on: 06/03/2010 13:38:37 »
Hello....I likes this Site.. kindof... buht i need more info on Anitbubbles and this site did not provide me with that........ um.....and the videos did not show a clear picture of antibubbless

Nessa

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« Reply #11 on: 30/03/2010 21:20:03 »
omg @ the last comment!  Well I bet the creators are very sorry and will come grovelling to you with compensation because after all they WERE trying to write a droll, detailed scientific paper rather than making a fun website!  Why don't you make them yourself if you can't see them on the video... which is very clear to me?  

hailey

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« Reply #12 on: 14/04/2010 20:40:51 »
I agree with brittany.. this science project sucks.. it doesnt work and it gets boring.. if your gona be lazy when picking a project at least pick one that is better than this one.

Sci Teacher

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« Reply #13 on: 09/09/2010 15:48:58 »
Thanks! I'll be using this as a transition activity between "the chemistry of life" and "Cells" I hope it help students have a more meaningful understanding of what a membrane is.

udontknowme

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« Reply #14 on: 11/02/2011 17:59:08 »
omg this is awewsome thank youcfor making this i got a 2nd place award

Peter

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« Reply #15 on: 04/05/2011 00:31:05 »
Just looked up antibubbles and found this site - I remember playing at my mother's sink in about 1964 when I was about 9 years old and observing this phenomenon.  Lots of what I termed antidrips (those skidding on the surface) and occasional antibubbles (yes, I gave them the same term).  I have also noticed the antidrips on the surface of very clear running water eg by small waterfalls / rapids.

Trappedinbluecollar

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« Reply #16 on: 05/07/2011 02:54:38 »
Noticed at my work that there were some spheres of what appeared to be water skittering across the water, but were visibly different from the bubbles which were slow in comparison.  I asked others if they had noticed this occurrence themselves, but to no avail, they looked at me somewhat askance.  Thank you for helping feed my curiosity.

 

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