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Author Topic: Could vitamin D kill viruses?  (Read 84105 times)

Offline Kevan Gelling

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #75 on: 02/12/2009 21:19:54 »
Unless you are prepared to take part in this experiment you are accepting that vitamin D doesn't kill viruses.

Give it up BC!

Beside the glaring false dichotomy, it has never suggested that vitamin D can kill all viruses or that it could kill a particular virus with 100% certainty.  Only that vitamin D is part of the innate immune system, via the production of cathelicidin, and can 'cause the death of' some viruses.  And the comparison with bleach is nonsense.

Retort with science rather than the ridiculous, please!
« Last Edit: 02/12/2009 21:44:58 by Kevan Gelling »
 

Offline Kevan Gelling

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #76 on: 02/12/2009 21:33:31 »
This post was originally an private email to Dr Chris.  It was highly speculative and I sent it to him because he is a living, breathing virologist.

Evidence has since been documented in this post that shows vitamin D is part of the innate immune system via the production of the anti-microbial peptides and that, in particular, cathelicidin has anti-viral properties.  There is also evidence that viruses may be the cause of some 'vitamin D deficient' morbidities - hypertension, MS, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer.  Is it possible the reason for the correlation is that a sufficient vitamin D level can prevent viral infections and thus prevent the onset of said morbidities?

Dr Chris, what is your view?
« Last Edit: 02/12/2009 21:44:15 by Kevan Gelling »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #77 on: 03/12/2009 19:28:35 »
"Beside the glaring false dichotomy, it has never suggested that vitamin D can kill all viruses"
Please provide the details of any virus that it kills in the sort of experiment I described.
Even any virus where there's a reduction of the titre by a few log units would do.

My point is that it has not (at least here) been shown to kill any virus. It really is a viruscide in that same way that chocolate cake is.
 

Offline iko

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #78 on: 11/12/2009 17:48:11 »
Allow me a cut&paste: Historical notes about vitamin D 'power'!  ;D

...even if you were a young lion, without proper sunlight exposure...you would be just dead.

Some recent discussion about ancient reports of cod liver oil use...




Rickets in Lion Cubs at the London Zoo in 1889: Some New Insights.


Chesney RW, Hedberg G.
aDepartment of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.

In 1889, when Dr John Bland-Sutton, a prominent surgeon in London, England, was consulted concerning fatal rickets in more than 20 successive litters of lion cubs at the London Zoo, he evaluated the role of diet relative to the development of rickets. He prescribed goat meat and bones and cod-liver oil to be added to the lean horse-meat diet of the cubs and their mothers. Rickets reversed, the cubs survived, and litters were reared successfully. In classic controlled studies conducted in puppies and young rats 3 decades later, the crucial role of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D in both prevention and therapy of rickets was elucidated. Later studies led to the identification of the structural features of vitamin D. Although the Bland-Sutton interventional diet obviously provides calcium and phosphate from bones and vitamin D from cod-liver oil, other benefits of this diet were not initially recognized.
Chewing bones promotes tooth and gum health and removes bacteria-laden tartar.
Cod-liver oil also contains vitamin A, which is essential for the prevention of infection and for epithelial cell health. Taurine-conjugated bile salts are also necessary for the intestinal absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, including A and D. Moreover, unlike dogs and rats, all feline species are unable to synthesize taurine yet can only conjugate bile acids with taurine. This sulfur-containing beta-amino acid must be provided in the carnivorous diet of a large cat.
Taurine-conjugated bile salts were provided in the oil cold-pressed from cod liver.
The now famous Bland-Sutton "experiment of nature," namely, fatal rickets in lion cubs, was cured by the addition of minerals and vitamin D. However, gum health and the presence of taurine-conjugated bile salts undoubtedly permitted absorption of vitamin A and D, the latter promoting the cure of rickets.

Pediatrics. 2009 Apr 6. [Epub ahead of print]


« Last Edit: 12/12/2009 13:27:06 by iko »
 

Offline alanan

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #79 on: 30/12/2009 05:09:41 »
During the last winter,when people all around me were contacting various strains of influenza I took 4,000 units of vitamin d per day. I did not have any flu vaccinations, and I went through the winter without catching a cold or Flu. That's good enough for me. alanan
 

Offline iko

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #80 on: 30/12/2009 12:04:25 »
You did the right thing...but this is not enough, scientifically speaking:
fortunately flu epidemics hit a relatively small percentage of people.
I'm sure you know Dr. John Cannell's story:


...and if you decide to go on with your 'treatment' in the near future, you might enjoy other more important benefits of D-vitamin, which is not a vitamin but a hormone produced by proper sunlight exposure: the sunshine hormone;)

« Last Edit: 31/12/2009 15:01:32 by iko »
 

Offline alanan

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #81 on: 03/01/2010 07:29:52 »
you would not absorb much sunlight with that ski suit on!!~
 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 03/01/2010 18:26:02 by iko »
 

Offline Kevan Gelling

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #83 on: 15/01/2010 13:47:24 »
Good to see the results from some trials coming through.

From Haaretz (Israeli newspaper)

Quote
Vitamin D could help fight hepatitis C

A new study has found that administering vitamin D to hepatitis C patients dramatically reduces the presence of the virus in the blood.

The study, carried out at Rebecca Sieff Hospital in Safed and Hillel Yaffeh Medical Center in Hadera by Dr. Assy Nimer and Dr. Saif Abu-Mouch covered 90 hepatitis C patients.

The findings were presented in late November at a conference of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

For six months, in addition to the standard treatment, which included Interferon once a week and a daily dose of the antiviral drug Ribavirin, 30 patients were also treated with 1,000 units of vitamin D a day. A control group of 60 patients went without the vitamin.

In order to assess the impact of vitamin D on the treatment of the disease, before starting the study, all patients, including those from the control group and those who were found to have a vitamin D deficiency, were given supplements, so that all participants began the study from the same point.

A month after the start of treatment, the virus had disappeared from the blood in 44 percent of the group receiving vitamin D supplements, as opposed to just 18 percent among the control group.

After three months, the success rate for the group getting the supplement rose to 96 percent, compared to 48 percent in the control group.

Other findings from the study, which will be presented next month in Kfar Blum at a conference of the Israeli Association for the Study of the Liver, indicate that this trend continues even after the end of drug treatment.

The initial results show that six months after the end of treatment, 90 percent of patients treated with drug therapy and vitamin D supplements had the virus disappear and completely recovered.

"The drug treatment for hepatitis C patients is usually administered for around a year, and occasionally the virus disappears from the blood, but remains in other places, for example, in the liver and lymph glands," explained Nimer, the director of the Liver Disease Unit at Rebecca Sieff Hospital. "At the end of the treatment, the virus may return to the blood, but we found that in patients who were also given the vitamin D supplement, the virus did not return, that is, it was excreted by the body."

How vitamin D helps improve the condition of hepatitis patients is not entirely clear. However, according to Nimer, "It has already been proven that vitamin D benefits the immune system by increasing the activity of T cells [white blood cells that help in the fight against pathogens], improves the body's reaction to the insulin hormone, and reduces the level of pro-inflammatory proteins that cause liver infections caused by viruses."

...


 

Offline ch3ls3a

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #84 on: 20/01/2010 17:35:21 »
Hello,
Im not sure about viruses but psoriasis (a disease which affects the skin) can be almost cured when the affected skin is in direct sunlight which contains big amounts of vitamin D so this could help kill viruses  ???
 

Offline syhprum

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #85 on: 06/02/2010 18:17:31 »
As a boy in the thirties suffering fro asthma I used to visit Great Ormand street hospital to be irradiated with UV presumably to create vitamin D.
I cannot recall if it did any good.
 

Offline iko

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #86 on: 18/02/2010 14:21:56 »
As a boy in the thirties suffering fro asthma I used to visit Great Ormond street hospital to be irradiated with UV presumably to create vitamin D.
I cannot recall if it did any good.



...vitamin d and asthma: new studies for a new century!!!   :D


Vitamin D, the immune system and asthma.

Lange NE, Litonjua A, Hawrylowicz CM, Weiss S.

Channing Laboratory, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA Tel.: +1 617 525 0874 nlange@partners.org.

The effects of vitamin D on bone metabolism and calcium homeostasis have long been recognized. Emerging evidence has implicated vitamin D as a critical regulator of immunity, playing a role in both the innate and cell-mediated immune systems. Vitamin D deficiency has been found to be associated with several immune-mediated diseases, susceptibility to infection and cancer. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the possible link between vitamin D and asthma. Further elucidation of the role of vitamin D in lung development and immune system function may hold profound implications for the prevention and treatment of asthma.

Expert Rev Clin Immunol. 2009 Nov;5(6):693-702.


« Last Edit: 06/03/2010 11:08:19 by iko »
 

Offline Variola

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Offline Kevan Gelling

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #88 on: 09/03/2010 20:34:59 »
Here's the abstract from Nature Immunology

Quote
Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

Abstract

Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-γ1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering led to an upregulation of ~75-fold in PLC-γ1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-γ1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-γ1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation.


From the Copenhagen University press release

Quote

"We have discovered that the first stage in the activation of a T cell involves vitamin D, explains Professor Carsten Geisler from the Department of International Health, Immunology and Microbiology. When a T cell is exposed to a foreign pathogen, it has an immediate biochemical reaction and extends a signaling device or ‘antenna' known as a vitamin D receptor, with which it search for vitamin D. This means that the T cell must have vitamin D or activation of the cell will cease. If the T cells cannot find enough vitamin D in the blood, they won't even begin to mobilise."



 

Offline Kevan Gelling

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #89 on: 09/03/2010 20:43:19 »

Get out in that frosty morning sunshine...!


Unfortunately at a latitude of 52o (Birmingham) and above, the winter sun is too low in the sky for UVB light to create vitamin D in the skin for 6 months of the year (October to March) 1.


1. Webb, A. R., Kline, L. &  Holick, M. F. Influence of season and latitude on the cutaneous synthesis of vitamin d3: Exposure to winter sunlight in boston and edmonton will not promote vitamin d3 synthesis in human skin. J Clin Endocrinol Metab  67, 373-378 (1988). http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jcem-67-2-373
 

Offline Joe.X

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #90 on: 10/03/2010 05:11:10 »
Vitamin D have been vertificated to be a activator in T cell immunology by Denmarkish
 

Offline alanan

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #91 on: 12/03/2010 05:56:48 »
 

Offline iko

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #92 on: 13/03/2010 19:11:15 »
Try looking at this site http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/OnCall/study-vitamin-kills-cancer-cells/story?id=9904415
Exciting and quite promising, alanan...
...nevertheless: "In Tests, Vitamin D Shrinks Breast Cancer Cells.
Results Encouraging, But Don't Read Too Much Into Them, Says Dr. Richard Besser".

There is something new about vitamin D and influenza viruses...
a bit closer to the title of this very thread:


Randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation
 to prevent seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren.

Urashima M, Segawa T, Okazaki M, Kurihara M, Wada Y, Ida H.
Division of Molecular Epidemiology Jikei University School of Medicine Minato-ku Tokyo Japan.

BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, no rigorously designed clinical trials have evaluated the relation between vitamin D and physician-diagnosed seasonal influenza.
OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effect of vitamin D supplements on the incidence of seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren.
DESIGN: From December 2008 through March 2009, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing vitamin D(3) supplements (1200 IU/d) with placebo in schoolchildren. The primary outcome was the incidence of influenza A, diagnosed with influenza antigen testing with a nasopharyngeal swab specimen.
RESULTS: Influenza A occurred in 18 of 167 (10.8%) children in the vitamin D(3) group compared with 31 of 167 (18.6%) children in the placebo group [relative risk (RR), 0.58; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.99; P = 0.04]. The reduction in influenza A was more prominent in children who had not been taking other vitamin D supplements (RR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.17, 0.79; P = 0.006) and who started nursery school after age 3 y (RR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.17, 0.78; P = 0.005). In children with a previous diagnosis of asthma, asthma attacks as a secondary outcome occurred in 2 children receiving vitamin D(3) compared with 12 children receiving placebo (RR: 0.17; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.73; P = 0.006).

CONCLUSION: This study suggests that vitamin D(3) supplementation during the winter may reduce the incidence of influenza A, especially in specific subgroups of schoolchildren.

This trial was registered at https://center.umin.ac.jp as UMIN000001373.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar 10. [Epub ahead of print]


« Last Edit: 30/03/2010 16:57:56 by iko »
 

Offline linda5508

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #93 on: 03/06/2010 19:35:06 »
well yes vitamin d can help prevent illnesses but i'm not too sure about curing illnesses

newbielink:http://www.vitaminddeficiencysymptoms.org [nonactive]
 

Offline iko

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #94 on: 20/06/2010 09:33:38 »
D-vitamin newsletter!  ;D ;D ;D



Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections in healthy adults.

Sabetta JR, Depetrillo P, Cipriani RJ, Smardin J, Burns LA, Landry ML.

Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Declining serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D seen in the fall and winter as distance increases from the equator may be a factor in the seasonal increased prevalence of influenza and other viral infections. This study was done to determine if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations correlated with the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: In this prospective cohort study serial monthly concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured over the fall and winter 2009-2010 in 198 healthy adults, blinded to the nature of the substance being measured. The participants were evaluated for the development of any acute respiratory tract infections by investigators blinded to the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. The incidence of infection in participants with different concentrations of vitamin D was determined. One hundred ninety-five (98.5%) of the enrolled participants completed the study. Light skin pigmentation, lean body mass, and supplementation with vitamin D were found to correlate with higher concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Concentrations of 38 ng/ml or more were associated with a significant (p<0.0001) two-fold reduction in the risk of developing acute respiratory tract infections and with a marked reduction in the percentages of days ill.
CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Maintenance of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentration of 38 ng/ml or higher should significantly reduce the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections and the burden of illness caused thereby, at least during the fall and winter in temperate zones. The findings of the present study provide direction for and call for future interventional studies examining the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in reducing the incidence and severity of specific viral infections, including influenza, in the general population and in subpopulations with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, such as pregnant women, dark skinned individuals, and the obese.

PLoS One. 2010 Jun 14;5(6):e11088



« Last Edit: 20/06/2010 10:10:16 by iko »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #95 on: 20/06/2010 11:21:02 »
There's an important word in that.
"Declining serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D seen in the fall and winter as distance increases from the equator may be a factor in the seasonal increased prevalence of influenza and other viral infections".

Correlation does not imply causation.
It seems to me to be at least as likely that colds are correlated with low vitamin D levels simply because both tend to happen in Winter. In any group some people will be affected more than others by Winter.
The other obvious potential cause  for the correlation is that poor diet drops vitamin D levels and promotes infections.

Even if the correlation in this case is due to causation it still doesn't show that vitamin D kills viruses any better than chocolate cake does.
 

Offline iko

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #96 on: 20/06/2010 13:18:50 »
Hi B.C.,

May be
You are right.
But a previous post reported an RCT, the 'gold standard' in modern medicine:

Try looking at this site http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/OnCall/study-vitamin-kills-cancer-cells/story?id=9904415
Exciting and quite promising, alanan...
...nevertheless: "In Tests, Vitamin D Shrinks Breast Cancer Cells.
Results Encouraging, But Don't Read Too Much Into Them, Says Dr. Richard Besser".

There is something new about vitamin D and influenza viruses...
a bit closer to the title of this very thread:


Randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation
 to prevent seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren.

Urashima M, Segawa T, Okazaki M, Kurihara M, Wada Y, Ida H.
Division of Molecular Epidemiology Jikei University School of Medicine Minato-ku Tokyo Japan.

BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, no rigorously designed clinical trials have evaluated the relation between vitamin D and physician-diagnosed seasonal influenza.
OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effect of vitamin D supplements on the incidence of seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren.
DESIGN: From December 2008 through March 2009, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing vitamin D(3) supplements (1200 IU/d) with placebo in schoolchildren. The primary outcome was the incidence of influenza A, diagnosed with influenza antigen testing with a nasopharyngeal swab specimen.
RESULTS: Influenza A occurred in 18 of 167 (10.8%) children in the vitamin D(3) group compared with 31 of 167 (18.6%) children in the placebo group [relative risk (RR), 0.58; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.99; P = 0.04]. The reduction in influenza A was more prominent in children who had not been taking other vitamin D supplements (RR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.17, 0.79; P = 0.006) and who started nursery school after age 3 y (RR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.17, 0.78; P = 0.005). In children with a previous diagnosis of asthma, asthma attacks as a secondary outcome occurred in 2 children receiving vitamin D(3) compared with 12 children receiving placebo (RR: 0.17; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.73; P = 0.006).

CONCLUSION: This study suggests that vitamin D(3) supplementation during the winter may reduce the incidence of influenza A, especially in specific subgroups of schoolchildren.

This trial was registered at https://center.umin.ac.jp as UMIN000001373.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar 10. [Epub ahead of print]



« Last Edit: 20/06/2010 13:20:29 by iko »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #97 on: 20/06/2010 14:26:03 »
So, it does as good a job as chocolate cake.
For those people who are poorly nourished, improving their diet improves their health.
Not exactly rocket science and not evidence for vitamin D killing the virus.
 

Offline iko

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #98 on: 20/06/2010 16:22:41 »
So, it does as good a job as chocolate cake.
For those people who are poorly nourished, improving their diet improves their health.
Not exactly rocket science and not evidence for vitamin D killing the virus.

Chocolate cake has much better taste than vitamin D.
I agree, but you seem to have missed a basic point here:
Vitamin D does NOT come from your diet mostly (90-95%).
Consequently, this hormone is NOT a vitamin.
« Last Edit: 20/06/2010 16:26:45 by iko »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
« Reply #99 on: 20/06/2010 19:39:30 »
As one of those papers points out "Light skin pigmentation, lean body mass, and supplementation with vitamin D were found to correlate with higher concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D." so eating the stuff raises your levels of it. It might not be a dominant route for the production of the stuff in plasma, but it's certainly measurable.

The name vitamin originally only referred to amines, ("Vital amines" in particular) so vitamins  A, C, D, E, and K are not vitamins.

No matter what you call the stuff, it doesn't kill viruses.
 

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Could vitamin D kill viruses?
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