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Author Topic: Does Lorentz contraction affect a stationary object that you pass at high speed?  (Read 33259 times)

Offline Vern

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I don't think there is any question that Lorentz length contraction is a physical fact of nature. The very concept of it was forced upon us by observations that things do not behave as they should. We had to either modify our concepts of time and space or our concepts of the composition of matter to explain the observations.

Most people find it easier to modify the concept of time and space to explain relativity phenomena. I find it more satisfying to modify the concept of the composition of matter. But if the latter is the reality, it greatly reduces the options of the true nature of the universe. If space-time is flat, the universe can't be expanding. If matter is simply electromagnetic change, black holes can not exist. And many more.
 

Offline amrit

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Lorentz contraction exist only as a math idea
nothing contract when moving
only time contract, this means that clocks run slower by moving faster
time is run of clocks
 

Offline Vern

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Lorentz contraction exist only as a math idea
nothing contract when moving
only time contract, this means that clocks run slower by moving faster
time is run of clocks
Not only do we know that Lorentz contraction does actually happen. We know why it happens. Why do you suppose that it does not happen? Can you cite any physical phenomena that suggests that Lorentz contraction does not happen?
 

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