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Author Topic: What type of moth is this?  (Read 8241 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

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What type of moth is this?
« on: 31/03/2009 08:05:35 »


That is 1 hell of a size!


 

blakestyger

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #1 on: 31/03/2009 10:54:29 »
It's an Atlas moth. One of, if not the, largest.
 

Offline Karen W.

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #2 on: 31/03/2009 11:16:15 »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlas_moth

Attacus atlas
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Atlas Moth

Scientific classification
Kingdom:    Animalia
Phylum:    Arthropoda
Order:    Lepidoptera
Family:    Saturniidae
Genus:    Attacus
Species:    A. atlas
Binomial name
Attacus atlas
(Linnaeus, 1758)

The Atlas moth (Attacus atlas) is a large saturniid moth found in the tropical and subtropical forests of Southeast Asia, southern China, common across the Malay archipelago, Thailand to Indonesia.[1] In India, Atlas moths are cultivated for their silk in a non-commercial capacity; unlike that produced by the related Silkworm moth (Bombyx mori), Atlas moth silk is secreted as broken strands. This brown, wool-like silk is thought to have greater durability and is known as fagara.[2] Atlas moth cocoons have been employed as purses in Taiwan.

Atlas moths are considered to be the largest moths in the world[3] in terms of total wing surface area (upwards of c. 400 square cm or 65 square inches). Their wingspans are also amongst the largest, from 25-30 cm (10-12 inches). Females are appreciably larger and heavier. (The largest lepidopteran in terms of wingspan is thought to be the White Witch, Thysania agrippina. A record specimen of Attacus atlas from Java measured 262 mm while Thysania are claimed to be about 270-280 mm or 11 inches. Based on some spread specimens and angle of wing, actual measurements of around 289 mm have been estimated.[4]) Atlas moths are said to be named after either the Titan of Greek mythology, or their map-like wing patterns. In Hong Kong the Cantonese name translates as "snake's head moth", referring to apical extension of the forewing, which bears a passing resemblance to a snake's head.[5]

Atlas moths are predominantly tawny to maroon in colour with roughly triangular, diaphanous "eyes" on both forewing and hindwing, bordered in black. The purpose of these dramatic, gossamer portals is not clear, but they are thought to play a role in predator avoidance. Their bodies are hairy and disproportionately small compared to their wings. Patterns and colouration vary among the many described subspecies. Male Atlas moths are distinguished from females by their smaller size, more tapered wings, and larger, bushier antennae. Neither sex possess fully-formed mouthparts and therefore do not feed; throughout their 1-2 week adult life they survive entirely on larval fat reserves that they build up while they are caterpillars.[6]

Females are sexually passive, releasing powerful pheromones which males detect and home in on with the help of chemoreceptors located on their large feathery antennae. Males may thus be attracted from several kilometres downwind.[7] Atlas moths are unsteady fliers and the female does not stray far from the location of her discarded chrysalis: she seeks a perch where the air currents will best carry her pheromones.

Once mated the female lays a number of spherical eggs 2.5 mm in diameter on the undersides of leaves. Dusty-green caterpillars hatch after about two weeks and feed voraciously on the foliage of certain citrus and other evergreen trees.[8] The caterpillars are adorned with fleshy spines along their backs which are covered in a waxy white substance. After reaching a length of about 115 mm (4.5 inches), the caterpillars pupate within papery cocoon interwoven into desiccated leaves. The adult moths emerge after about four weeks.

 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #3 on: 31/03/2009 11:17:37 »
Thank you both. I thought at first it may be a fake. I didn't realise moths got that big.
 

Offline Karen W.

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #4 on: 31/03/2009 11:35:15 »
Thank you Blackstyger for putting a name to them!!

Your welcome Doc.. Thanks for the cool Piccy!

My son says he has seen them here where we live... him and his sister.. Surprised the Shilt out of both of them.. they did not know nor did I that any were here.. but I understand they have been found here and around central California also.. Such a shame they only live 10 days.
« Last Edit: 31/03/2009 11:37:42 by Karen W. »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #5 on: 31/03/2009 12:27:27 »
Sod having 1 of those flying around in the kitchen! They could do some damage.
 

Offline JnA

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #6 on: 31/03/2009 13:50:59 »
that is stunning..  though it would scare the heebies out of me if I saw it flying around.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #7 on: 31/03/2009 16:46:50 »
that is stunning..  though it would scare the heebies out of me if I saw it flying around.

It's like Mothra from creature feature films.
 

Offline neilep

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #8 on: 31/03/2009 17:46:00 »
What about the big colourful one on the right ?
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #9 on: 31/03/2009 21:54:18 »
What about the big colourful one on the right ?

We really shouldn't have expected anything better.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #10 on: 01/04/2009 05:08:42 »
It's a bloody big mothquito!
 

Offline Don_1

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #11 on: 01/04/2009 09:14:57 »
The larvae of that big sod could do some damage in your wardrobe!!!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #12 on: 01/04/2009 09:31:04 »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #13 on: 01/04/2009 09:33:27 »
Here's an even bigger moth:

 

Offline Chemistry4me

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #14 on: 01/04/2009 09:34:45 »
Hey! Steady with the old hammer son!
Now that I have a headache...what ever am I going to do?
I KNOW! ;D
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #15 on: 01/04/2009 09:38:02 »
Here's an even angrier* mammoth!



*It could be up for debate.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #16 on: 01/04/2009 11:18:11 »
I can beat that...



MOTHcow!
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #17 on: 01/04/2009 11:23:05 »
>:(>:(

You little checky!
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #18 on: 01/04/2009 12:05:28 »
That's the MOTHer of all moths
 

Offline Don_1

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #19 on: 01/04/2009 13:27:16 »
I can beat that...

MOTHcow!

I thought this was a MOTH COW
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #20 on: 01/04/2009 21:10:40 »
haha, class.
 

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What type of moth is this?
« Reply #20 on: 01/04/2009 21:10:40 »

 

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