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Author Topic: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION  (Read 306635 times)

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #700 on: 13/09/2011 22:14:55 »
In case you missed it...  Geezer???

The third tool hanging on the wall is a 2 man bucksaw.  Before the chainsaw, they would have been used for cutting down trees, cutting up logs, firewood, and etc.  They are still used in wildernesses where motorized engines are prohibited.



The first tool is called a spider, and is used to check the set of the tooth as is shown in this Government Document



Every 5th (double) tooth on the saws above is called a raker tooth.  They remain flat (no set).

The second tool is used to measure the depth of these raker teeth.

 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #701 on: 14/09/2011 02:11:45 »
Ya got me Bugsy!

Wait a minute - in the first piccy it looks as if all four legs are resting an a flat surface, which cannot be the case.
 

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #702 on: 14/09/2011 03:07:11 »
I was told that this was used to gauge the flatness of stuff (granite tables?), although I'm not sure it wasn't also used for grinding.  My goal is to eventually make it into a telescope. 

↓↓↓↓
 

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #703 on: 14/09/2011 03:28:48 »
Here's another tool...  and some questions along the the same line.

Obviously an axe.
But, what type of axe?  Why?
And, why are there grooves in the handle?

 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #704 on: 14/09/2011 05:33:08 »
Here's another tool...  and some questions along the the same line.

Obviously an axe.
But, what type of axe?  Why?
And, why are there grooves in the handle?



It must be an axe that can be used by right or left-handed people. Why else would it have two cutting edges (unless it's for chopping down two trees at the same time?)
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #705 on: 14/09/2011 10:59:59 »
Here's another tool...  and some questions along the the same line.

Obviously an axe.
But, what type of axe?  Why?
And, why are there grooves in the handle?




I believe this is a double-bit axe.
It is used to Perform the same function as single-bit axe, only difference is it has two cutting edges one on each end of the head so that the lumbermen or person using the axe can rotate it in their hand and use both edges.. I believe the marks are the falling count.. how many trees its cut down.. but thats just kinda what I remember as a kid hearing. It was a long time ago so I can't be sure that my memory is correct.LOL

   The Double-bit axes have straight handles that are symmetrical with the double-edge head.
 I know one type or pattern head is called a western and then I think we used to have one that was refereed to as a reversible head. There are likely more but those are the types I have seen around here.
We are in the land of lumberjacks and most of them use the double bit axe wen downing  trees and working with the logs.. ect
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #706 on: 14/09/2011 11:02:33 »
Here's another tool...  and some questions along the the same line.

Obviously an axe.
But, what type of axe?  Why?
And, why are there grooves in the handle?




I believe this is a double-bit axe.
It is used to Perform the same function as single-bit axe, only difference is it has two cutting edges one on each end of the head so that the lumbermen or person using the axe can rotate it in their hand and use both edges.. I believe the marks are the falling count.. how many trees its cut down.. but thats just kinda what I remember as a kid hearing. It was a long time ago so I can't be sure that my memory is correct.LOL

   The Double-bit axes have straight handles that are symmetrical with the double-edge head. I think the straight handle kinda provided balance to the ax o the weight was dispersed evenly to either blade.
 I know one type or pattern head is called a western and then I think we used to have one that was refereed to as a reversible head. There are likely more but those are the types I have seen around here.
We are in the land of lumberjacks and most of them use the double bit axe wen downing  trees and working with the logs.. ect
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #707 on: 14/09/2011 11:04:53 »
P.S. that one looks dull enough to use as an awl..LOL Needs a good sharpening from looks of this picture..
 

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #708 on: 14/09/2011 12:50:37 »
Apparently not all double-bitted axe heads are the same.

This is a photo from E-Bay.  But, notice that one axe head is virtually flat on one side (like the one above).



Why?

Still no comments on the grooves in the axe handle?
 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #709 on: 14/09/2011 16:57:52 »
I tracked down an expert in this subject. Waiting to hear back from him.
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #710 on: 15/09/2011 02:18:09 »
Apparently not all double-bitted axe heads are the same.

This is a photo from E-Bay.  But, notice that one axe head is virtually flat on one side (like the one above).



Why?

Still no comments on the grooves in the axe handle?


Like I said I believe the marks in the handle represent the tree falling count..but Sam not sure how many trees to a  mark that one represents.....?
« Last Edit: 15/09/2011 02:21:06 by Karen W. »
 

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #711 on: 15/09/2011 03:29:24 »
I presume there is one mark per tree...
But, I'm told that there is a different reason for the marks as they aren't created with a pocket knife.
 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #712 on: 15/09/2011 03:40:29 »
I presume there is one mark per tree...
But, I'm told that there is a different reason for the marks as they aren't created with a pocket knife.

Looks like they are burned in. Is it the age of the shaft in terms of years of use?
 

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« Reply #713 on: 15/09/2011 06:25:03 »
They all.oat look burned in...?
 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #714 on: 15/09/2011 08:37:42 »
They all.oat look burned in...?

Yes. Oats tend to be very burny.
 

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« Reply #715 on: 15/09/2011 09:42:48 »
Lol.. I said the same... the marks looked burned in.. sorry for my tiny phone keys and predictive text that has a mind of its own...
 

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #716 on: 15/09/2011 11:24:08 »
Ok,
You're getting a bit closer.

So, what was used to "burn in" the lines?
 

Offline imatfaal

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« Reply #717 on: 15/09/2011 13:44:09 »
The hot axe blade when being reforged / re-tempered?
 

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #718 on: 16/09/2011 04:33:13 »
I've sharpened axes...  but never retempered them.

Single blade axes suffer from being used as sledges and wedges, but that isn't an issue with double-bitted axes. 

I doubt that anybody has whacked into railroad irons or something enough times to warrant multiple major rebuilds of the axe head without also breaking the handle.
 

Offline imatfaal

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« Reply #719 on: 16/09/2011 11:52:38 »
Old steel would blunt quickly after much use - my uncle used to get his chisels redone (he was a cabinet maker since before wwii - now sadly gone).  He claimed that over time the whacking used to make all the steel the same all over - the body of the chisel would go brittle from being soft and flexible and the tip would become soft from being hard and brittle.  whether this was an old wives tale I do not know
 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #720 on: 17/09/2011 06:51:55 »
Old steel would blunt quickly after much use - my uncle used to get his chisels redone (he was a cabinet maker since before wwii - now sadly gone).  He claimed that over time the whacking used to make all the steel the same all over - the body of the chisel would go brittle from being soft and flexible and the tip would become soft from being hard and brittle.  whether this was an old wives tale I do not know

Never heard that one before. I think it's a bit suspect, but maybe he was right. If he was in the habit of using a grinding wheel to sharpen them, the heat produced could affect the hardness, but it's more usual to sharpen them on a stone by hand.

Wot we need is a meta-lurgy-cal person to 'splain this to us.

I don't think axe heads are hardened that much. Last time I sharpened my hand axe, I seem to remember I used a file, then a stone to put the final edge on it.   
 

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #721 on: 18/09/2011 05:36:10 »
Ok,

I think we got sidetracked a bit.  So much for woodsy stuff.

Anyway, the axe in the photo above is a feller's (or faller's) axe.  The flat edge on the bottom is supposed to make the axe into a T-Square that can be used to determine the direction a tree will fall.  What if the axe handle is warped as above?

http://www.fs.fed.us/t-d/pubs/htmlpubs/htm99232823/page04.htm


As far as the notches.  I thought I was told that it was providing a guide for the crosscut saw while cutting down the trees, but the best I can tell, it has to do with underbucking with a buck saw.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underbucking


Although the Wikipedia article does suggest using a single-bit axe, presumably so you won't fall into the axe head.

As mentioned, it will give a crude count of the number of underbucks that have been done.

Geezer suggested a burnt effect, but it would be friction burning.
 

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #722 on: 23/09/2011 02:45:10 »
Ok...

Here is something entirely different...
I have a guess on what it is...  we'll see if my guess is the same as what others come up with.

I'll answer any questions that you come up with (that I can answer).

 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #723 on: 23/09/2011 04:31:08 »
Is it made of graphite?
 

Offline CliffordK

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« Reply #724 on: 23/09/2011 04:37:22 »
Is it made of graphite?
Good question.  And, it does appear to be graphite, or a high carbon compound.  And it did chip when I dropped it.  The screw appears to be a copper alloy (copper, brass, or bronze), and does not come out the other end.

P.S.
It appears as if Geezer is on the right track.... 
Does anybody ELSE have the answer?
« Last Edit: 23/09/2011 04:53:24 by CliffordK »
 

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
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