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Author Topic: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION  (Read 307529 times)

Offline SeanB

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #725 on: 23/09/2011 09:42:01 »
A idler pulley of some sort, most likely for light duty, probably in a wet environment.
 

Offline damocles

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #726 on: 23/09/2011 11:29:07 »
looks to me like some sort of sharpening stone or grindstone that has lost its handle
 

Online Bored chemist

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #727 on: 23/09/2011 12:20:05 »
I note that both graphite and brass are used as electrical conductors, but I don't know hat this object is for. Could it be the carbon rod from a leclanche cell?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leclanch%C3%A9_cell
 

Offline CliffordK

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #728 on: 23/09/2011 16:04:25 »
As far as the pulley, it is light (which is good), but as mentioned, it chipped easily when dropped, and the screw doesn't seem strong enough to take much abuse.  So, I'm doubtful.

I haven't tried scraping  it, but if it is carbon, it would likely crumble more than a whetstone.  It also has a gear tooth like shape that would be inconvenient for sharpening many items.

I note that both graphite and brass are used as electrical conductors, but I don't know hat this object is for. Could it be the carbon rod from a leclanche cell?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leclanch%C3%A9_cell

Geezer?  Your thoughts?

The battery post is down my line of reasoning, The carbon part reminds me of the carbon rod that one finds in the middle of typical alkaline batteries, just much bigger.

The screw reminds me of the screw-on top on many 6V lantern batteries.

Unfortunately I haven't taken apart many larger alkaline batteries.  At about 6" long, it would be tall for a lantern battery, and everything I see indicate that at least the modern 6V batteries are made of multiple independent smaller cells wired together.
 

Offline Geezer

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #729 on: 23/09/2011 17:09:03 »
I was thinking it might be a brush for a large dynamo or motor. The fluted section is likely to prevent rotation, which is required with a brush.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #730 on: 23/09/2011 18:31:19 »
Interesting idea.  The end is flat and not worn concave.  However, it doesn't mean it isn't new.  The profile, however, is round (with flutes).  Most brushes I've seen are square or rectangular because they are designed to match the shape of the commutator.

The piece was found in the mountains near a long abandoned remote homestead which is also in a mining region.
 

Offline damocles

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #731 on: 23/09/2011 20:27:34 »
Unfortunately I haven't taken apart many larger alkaline batteries.  At about 6" long, it would be tall for a lantern battery, and everything I see indicate that at least the modern 6V batteries are made of multiple independent smaller cells wired together.

The voltage put out by a galvanic cell depends on the chemical reaction that takes place when electricity is generated. The maximum possible for any practical system is around 2.5 volt, and most of the practical cells produce about 1.5 volt. (Lead-Acid as in a car battery is 2.0 volt). So any 6 volt battery must consist of 3 or 4 cells wired in series.

But we are here looking at a rather old artifact, so 6 volt is probably rather irrelevant. I think that Bored Chemist's suggestion
Could it be the carbon rod from a leclanche cell?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leclanch%C3%A9_cell
is the least problematic of the various suggestions so far put forward.

The fluted profile is consistent with trying to maximise the surface area of an electrode, while maintaining the mechanical integrity of a rather fragile material.
« Last Edit: 23/09/2011 20:31:46 by damocles »
 

Offline Geezer

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #732 on: 23/09/2011 20:47:27 »
Unfortunately I haven't taken apart many larger alkaline batteries.  At about 6" long, it would be tall for a lantern battery, and everything I see indicate that at least the modern 6V batteries are made of multiple independent smaller cells wired together.

The voltage put out by a galvanic cell depends on the chemical reaction that takes place when electricity is generated. The maximum possible for any practical system is around 2.5 volt, and most of the practical cells produce about 1.5 volt. (Lead-Acid as in a car battery is 2.0 volt). So any 6 volt battery must consist of 3 or 4 cells wired in series.

But we are here looking at a rather old artifact, so 6 volt is probably rather irrelevant. I think that Bored Chemist's suggestion
Could it be the carbon rod from a leclanche cell?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leclanch%C3%A9_cell
is the least problematic of the various suggestions so far put forward.

The fluted profile is consistent with trying to maximise the surface area of an electrode, while maintaining the mechanical integrity of a rather fragile material.

Give the location, and the rather wimpy connection, I think that's a good assumption.

Clifford, can you measure its resistance?
 

Offline CliffordK

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #733 on: 23/09/2011 21:10:53 »
Clifford, can you measure its resistance?
Awww heck,
I just use my meter as a go/no-go gauge. 

Anyway, the resistance in the wires of the meter seems to be about 0.3 ohms.
The resistance from end to end on the "handle" seems to be about 0.8 ohms, or a difference of about 0.5 ohms.

I may have to do some polishing as I seem to get some very high resistance across the screw.
 

Offline Geezer

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #734 on: 24/09/2011 00:08:37 »

Anyway, the resistance in the wires of the meter seems to be about 0.3 ohms.


Isn't there a lttle thingy you can adjust to zero the reading? Either that, or you are needing to change the battery before it leaks and ruins your meter :D

If it's about 0.5 Ω, it does sound a bit high for a motor brush, so that would suggest it's the carbon  electrode for a primary cell as BC and the dangly sword guy suggest.
 

Offline terrildactl

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Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #735 on: 26/11/2011 17:37:12 »
It's a high tech refrigerant condenser. It could also be an evaporator. Some sort of fluid flows through an orifice, and a sudden drop in pressure by an expansion chamber, Blah, blah, refrigeration simple, to cool, or warm, some thing that generates heat.
 

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #736 on: 21/12/2011 23:30:51 »
I think this is an exhaust fan.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #737 on: 04/03/2012 08:02:41 »
I was browsing at the local second hand store, and this showed up.



Perhaps I'm off my rocker with my interpretation...  let's see what the group thinks.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #738 on: 05/03/2012 07:58:44 »
No Comments?
RD had found a similar candle holder...

But, the question remains if there is any significance beyond planned obsolescence?
« Last Edit: 05/03/2012 08:15:33 by CliffordK »
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #739 on: 08/03/2012 07:09:37 »
Nothing?

Boy it is quiet here.

Maybe I should have posted it under "Geek Speek" (hint) as they certainly would have had some good interpretations there.
 

Offline Don_1

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #740 on: 08/03/2012 08:05:57 »
Perhaps this was not quite what it seemed. Not a celebration of the turn of the millennium, but a doomsday prediction that we would all be using candles after the millennium bug put an end to life as we know knew it.

Or there again, maybe it was a very early attempt at making a torch (flashlight) with a rating of 2000 candle power.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #741 on: 08/03/2012 09:11:28 »
Very close, there was such a prediction...  that many people took far too seriously.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #742 on: 10/03/2012 12:02:49 »
Ok, not much in the comments about the Candle.

In the late 90's, people became aware of a potential issue with dates, in that if the year was written with two digits (99), then the new year (00) would have a couple of issues.

00 < 99, rather than being larger than the previous year.
If one simply incremented the value for the year, 99+1 = 100, which could cause a number of unexpected errors when one is expecting a 2 digit date.
Dates might be calculated by concatenating the strings 19+the 2 digit year, so the new year might read 1900, or 19100.

This became known as the Millennium Bug.

Anyway, so there was a huge effort to clean up the code....  so that programs would work properly on the new year.  Many companies such as Microsoft released special Y2K patches.

Nonetheless, there were many people who were convinced that there would be a critical failure, such as a loss of major public utilities such as electricity.  Oregon Health Sciences University rented a huge semi-truck generator and wired it into their electrical system as a precaution. 

Of course, there were a number of other people who weren't convinced that power would be lost, but perhaps at most, utilities would have to do an extra run of their billing.

Of course, on January 1, 2000, there was not a single power outage anywhere in the world, but at least a few dates were written incorrectly.

So, it is my interpretation that the candle holder not only celebrates the new millennium, but also celebrates the millennium bug, and preparing for the predicted mass power failures.
 

Offline syhprum

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #743 on: 30/10/2012 13:34:52 »
The Earths moon seems to have grown rather it looks about the size of Mars.
 

Offline damocles

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #744 on: 30/10/2012 20:30:29 »
 
The Earths moon seems to have grown rather it looks about the size of Mars.
Yeah I was watching the magnificent moonrise out of my window last night and the Earth's moon looked many times the size of Mars.

(i.e. Wal, what on Earth -- or in the heavens -- is your last post relating to???)
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #745 on: 31/10/2012 11:34:53 »
Our moon, of course, is larger than Pluto.
It is nearly the size of Mercury.

And, if Syhprum had moved to Jupiter or Saturn, then perhaps he is thinking that both Jupiter and Saturn's largest moons are larger than Mercury, and approaching the size of Mars.


Click to enlarge.
http://tcaa.us/Astronomy/Moon.aspx
« Last Edit: 31/10/2012 11:36:50 by CliffordK »
 

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Re: Can you Guess What This is ? 1 OLD VERSION
« Reply #745 on: 31/10/2012 11:34:53 »

 

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