The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: electronics at speed of light  (Read 2289 times)

Offline erickejah

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 347
  • Parking? I make my own parking spot!!
    • View Profile
electronics at speed of light
« on: 10/04/2009 06:27:15 »
would the electronics still work in a spaceship going at speed of light? and why? :)


 

Offline lightarrow

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4586
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • View Profile
electronics at speed of light
« Reply #1 on: 10/04/2009 11:01:32 »
would the electronics still work in a spaceship going at speed of light? and why? :)
1. Yes.
2. For the same reason electronics work at 0 speed (at least, providing the ship is shielded against cosmic particles and radiations).
« Last Edit: 10/04/2009 11:03:08 by lightarrow »
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8669
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
electronics at speed of light
« Reply #2 on: 10/04/2009 17:20:26 »
No, because a ship can't get to the speed of light.
However, for a ship travelling at any speed the electronics would work because, otherwise, you would be able to sit on board the ship and say "The electronics have failed- we must be near C". However, since all velocity is relative there's no way you can judge speed from inside the ship; you need some external reference to measure it against.
 

Offline lightarrow

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4586
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • View Profile
electronics at speed of light
« Reply #3 on: 10/04/2009 19:47:44 »
Exactly.
 

Offline erickejah

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 347
  • Parking? I make my own parking spot!!
    • View Profile
electronics at speed of light
« Reply #4 on: 10/04/2009 20:04:40 »
ok, :) but does not the electron in a cable travels at 2/3 of C?
 

Offline LeeE

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3382
    • View Profile
    • Spatial
electronics at speed of light
« Reply #5 on: 10/04/2009 21:55:26 »
Nope, electrons travel relatively slowly.  An electromagnetic wave can travel down a dielectric cable at up to 2/3rds 'c', but that isn't the same as the electrons moving down the conductor.

Have a look at this short wiki article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_electricity
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

electronics at speed of light
« Reply #5 on: 10/04/2009 21:55:26 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums