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Author Topic: Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?  (Read 4805 times)

Chris Burgess

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Chris Burgess  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hi Chris,

If matter curves space inward towards itself, does antimatter curve space outward away from itself?

If a gravitational field is an energy field (Kip Thorne says so), then using mass/energy equivalence, can a unit of mass/matter be converted into a unit of contracting gravitational energy/space?

Can antimatter be converted into a unit of expanding gravitational energy/space?

If true is this why we live in an expanding universe where most of the antimatter was converted into units of expanding space?

Thanks,
Chris Burgess

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 12/04/2009 21:09:37 by chris »


 

Offline Vern

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Re: Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #1 on: 12/04/2009 17:18:20 »
All of the theories that enjoy any acceptance have anti-matter and matter reacting the same in a gravity field. There is very little experimental evidence because anti-matter is difficult to contain long enough to get a measurement. Both anti-matter and matter attract gravitationally and when one meets the other, they annihilate, becoming gamma radiation.

As far as I know, there is no theoretical mechanism that would produce anti-gravity.

Quote
Can antimatter be converted into a unit of expanding gravitational
energy/space?
Not by any process that I know about, or can imagine.
« Last Edit: 12/04/2009 17:22:15 by Vern »
 

Offline LeeE

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Re: Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #2 on: 12/04/2009 19:57:32 »
Just thought I'd point out that the mutual annihilation of matter/antimatter should produce a gravity wave due to the matter disappearing.
 

Offline AllenG

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Re: Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #3 on: 12/04/2009 20:30:28 »
Just thought I'd point out that the mutual annihilation of matter/antimatter should produce a gravity wave due to the matter disappearing.
Would nuclear reactions also produce gravity waves? There is a small loss of matter there.
 

Offline syhprum

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Re: Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #4 on: 12/04/2009 21:01:36 »
Any movment of mutualy gravitating bodies results in the generation of gravity waves.
I have read that Jupiter radiates 20 Watts somewhere.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #5 on: 13/04/2009 08:08:32 »
I would imagine so. An antigravitational object would be like ''opposising the curvature'' which would deflect a antigravitational object away from normal gravitating objects.

 

Offline swansont

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Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #6 on: 13/04/2009 19:19:09 »
Just thought I'd point out that the mutual annihilation of matter/antimatter should produce a gravity wave due to the matter disappearing.

Why?  Gravity in GR has an energy density dependence, not a mass dependence.  You should get a reduction because the energy leaves, but not from the annihilation itself (i.e. the change in mass).  IOW, photons contribute to gravity.
 

Offline swansont

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Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #7 on: 13/04/2009 19:20:20 »
Any movment of mutualy gravitating bodies results in the generation of gravity waves.
I have read that Jupiter radiates 20 Watts somewhere.

It's the acceleration that causes it, AFAIK.  Not just movement.
 

Offline LeeE

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Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #8 on: 15/04/2009 00:35:22 »
Jupiter is accelerating?
 

Offline syhprum

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Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #9 on: 16/04/2009 21:28:50 »
This article calculates the gravity wave power radiated by the Earth orbiting the Sun at 313 Watts at 3.17*10^-8 Hz

  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_wave
« Last Edit: 16/04/2009 21:33:39 by syhprum »
 

Offline yor_on

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Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #10 on: 18/04/2009 01:45:15 »
When antimatter and matter meets they disappear. There should be no wave created, as I see it, they are 'negating' each other, and don't 'explode'. on the other hand there should be a gravitational difference as they annihilates as they both follow spacetimes geodesics.

"The only direct experimental result on antimatter and gravity comes from Supernova 1987A. This supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud emitted both neutrinos and antineutrinos, some of which were eventually detected on Earth. Those neutrinos and antineutrinos took 160,000 years to reach Earth, and while travelling were bent from a "straight line" path by the gravity from our own galaxy. The bending with gravity changed the time needed to reach Earth by about 5 months, yet both the neutrinos and the antineutrinos reached Earth at roughly the same time (within the same 12 second interval). This shows that the neutrinos and antineutrinos "fell" similarly, to a very high level of precision (about 1 part in a million). [4] and [5] provide some background information on this."

http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/ParticleAndNuclear/antimatter_fall.html
 

Offline Obiewahn

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Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #11 on: 27/04/2009 15:56:07 »
See newbielink:http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16204-does-antimatter-fall-up.html [nonactive] for a current experiment to verify this.
 

Offline yor_on

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Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
« Reply #12 on: 23/10/2009 04:27:49 »
Does that experiment say what I think I read?

That they will create Atoms????

"It will first build highly unstable pairings of electrons and positrons, known as positronium, then excite them with lasers to prevent them annihilating too quickly. Clouds of antiprotons will rip these pairs apart, stealing their positrons to create neutral antihydrogen atoms."

Thanks for that one Obiewahn.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positronium
« Last Edit: 23/10/2009 04:30:16 by yor_on »
 

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Does anti-matter curve space in the opposite direction?
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