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Author Topic: Is there any difference between salt recovered from underground and sea salt?  (Read 6107 times)

Offline changz

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I presume people in the old times eat salt they harvest near their surroundings, is that right? If so, some don't live near the ocean and some others do. Were they different back then, considering some were harvested underground and some were harvested from the ocean?
« Last Edit: 28/05/2009 04:31:10 by chris »


 

Offline Chemistry4me

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I can't figure out what you are asking, do you mean something like: was the salt different? Considering the way they were harvested?
 

Offline Mazurka

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The trade in salt is thought to have driven the Establishment of the first roads and trade routes. 

In ancient times most salt is thought to have been sourced in dry coastal areas such as the Mediterranean.  Although there are some ancient salt mines in Pakistan, Southern Poland, Austria and Germany, it is only in relatively recent times that rock salt production has exceeded brine evaporation.  Brine comes directly from the sea or from salt springs such as those around Syracuse in the US or Cheshire in the UK.

Salt was so important that it was used by several cultures as money and it is thought that it is where the word salary comes from...
 

Offline changz

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interesting, if salt is so hard to get, how did our ancestral apes get it??
 

Offline JimBob

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Salts needed are found also in sedimentary deposits, exposed at the surface, that were formed in very high salinity lakes and ocean basins. They are more common that one might expect. There are also mineral laden springs, etc.

Sebkha deposits are rather common in the geologic record.

 
 

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