The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: How does the viscosity of a gas change with temperature?  (Read 37575 times)

Offline Donica

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Pleasd help me with this question. Does gas flow more slower or faster when heated? and why? I believe it does flow slower and is more viscous. But I'm unsure of this.
« Last Edit: 05/06/2009 07:41:49 by chris »


 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8669
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
How does the viscosity of a gas change with temperature?
« Reply #2 on: 05/06/2009 08:57:00 »
Quote
While liquids get runnier as they get hotter, gases get thicker. (If one can imagine a "thick" gas.) The viscosity of gases increases as temperature increases and is approximately proportional to the square root of temperature. This is due to the increase in the frequency of intermolecular collisions at higher temperatures.

http://hypertextbook.com/physics/matter/viscosity/
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

How does the viscosity of a gas change with temperature?
« Reply #2 on: 05/06/2009 08:57:00 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums